Yemen

Yemen

Postby Doc » Mon Sep 22, 2014 2:17 am

Iran backed Shite rebels take Yemeni capital
Oops my Obamapopcorn just finished.... got to go.


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/22/world ... -fire.html


Yemen Rebels Gain Concessions From Government After Assault on Capital

By SHUAIB ALMOSAWA and DAVID D. KIRKPATRICKSEPT. 21, 2014

SANA, Yemen — An assault on Yemen’s capital rocked the transitional government on Sunday as fighters from a Shiite rebel group stormed through the city, seizing government buildings, state media facilities and military bases. The military broke apart, some units appeared to side with rebels, and the prime minister abruptly resigned.

By late Sunday night, President Abdu Rabbu Mansour Hadi announced that the rebels, known as the Houthis, had agreed to an immediate cease-fire and the formation of a new “technocratic national government.” Although the details remained vague, analysts said the Houthis’ control over the capital would give them the upper hand in dictating the terms of any agreement.

“The agreement will, of course, reflect the new realities on the ground, where the Houthis are much stronger than before,” said Ibrahim Sharqieh, a researcher at the Brookings Institution’s center in Doha, Qatar, who focuses on conflict resolution. But, he noted, “the Houthis are not yet strong enough that they are able to take power without the other parties.”
Photo
Smoke rose from the headquarters of the First Armored Division in Sana on Sunday during an attack by Houthi rebels. Credit Mohammed Huwais/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Jamal Benomar, the special representative of the United Nations for Yemen, had announced a cease-fire on Saturday night, but it did not last until dawn. Nor did it impede the Houthis’ swift advance.

The Houthis’ gains on Sunday are certain to exacerbate sectarian and political tensions in the region: Saudi Arabia and the other Sunni Muslim-led Persian Gulf states believe that the Shiite rebels in Yemen are backed by their archrival, the Shiite state of Iran. The Sunni-led states of the gulf are waging a fierce proxy fight against Iran through the conflict in Syria, and three years ago Saudi Arabia even sent its troops to Bahrain to tamp down an uprising by its Shiite majority, in part because of fears that the movement’s leaders were in league with Iran.

“In the regional cold war, this has strengthened the position of the Iranians,” Mr. Sharqieh said. “For the Saudis, the Houthis arriving in Sana is definitely not good news.”

The Houthis’ success at strangling the government also puts new pressure on the Western-backed transition put in place after the removal of the strongman Ali Abdullah Saleh during the Arab Spring revolts. The presence of armed Houthi forces in the capital risks more sectarian clashes with the Sunni Muslim extremists from the southern Yemen strongholds of Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula.

And the turmoil is already jeopardizing the ability of Yemen’s feeble government to continue working with Washington against the Al Qaeda group. The conflict began building weeks ago when thousands of supporters of the Houthis, who are named for a powerful northern clan and have often clashed with the central government, began staging protests and blocking roads to demand the reinstatement of fuel subsidies and a cabinet shake-up. But by Thursday the protests had escalated into sporadic fighting in the streets of the capital.

The rebels fought with automatic rifles and artillery mounted on trucks, while security forces countered with shelling. News reports said at least 140 had died in the past four days of fighting. And President Hadi had denounced the Houthi attacks as an attempted coup.
Photo
Prime Minister Mohammed Salem Basindwa of Yemen, who resigned on Sunday. Credit Mohammed Huwais/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
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Continue reading the main story

On Saturday, the Houthis seized the state television building, a central symbol of the government’s power. State media reported Saturday night that military units were moving to recapture it, but instead the Houthis appear to have willingly turned over the site to the military police, a force that is regarded as independent of the government and perhaps potentially sympathetic to the rebels.

By Sunday afternoon, certain military units, including the Fourth Army Brigade and a military leadership center, had appeared to shift their support to the Houthis instead of the government, perhaps switching loyalties to back the winning side. The Houthis and their military allies had control of the state radio building as well as the state television building and the prime minister’s office.

As Houthis surrounded the building housing the Interior Ministry, the ministry issued a conciliatory statement saying that it had ordered the police to “cooperate” with the rebels “in consolidating security and stability.” The ministry called the Houthis “friends of the police in the service of the general interest of the homeland.”

Elsewhere, Houthi forces continued to battle other military units, most notably a major division considered loyal to Brig. Gen. Ali Mohsin al-Ahmar. One of the fragmented military’s most important commanders, General Ahmar comes from a powerful tribe and his family also has a leading role in Yemen’s mainstream Sunni Islamist party, Islah. Islah and the Ahmars both played major roles in the protests that forced out President Saleh, and they are considered political rivals of the Houthis.

They were also among the losers in the past week’s battles. By nightfall on Sunday, the Houthis had taken the headquarters of General Ahmar’s First Armored Division, according to security officials and news reports. The general’s whereabouts was unknown.

Prime Minister Mohammed Salem Basindwa, who resigned Sunday, is also linked to the Islah party, and the Houthis and others have accused him of corruption. But the circumstances of his decision were not completely clear.

“I have decided to tender my resignation from the government out of my concern to pave the way for any agreement reached between the brother leaders of Ansarullah” — the party of the Houthis — “and brother Abdu Rabbu Mansour Hadi, the president of the republic,” the prime minister wrote in a letter of resignation, according to Reuters.

Houthi news outlets, meanwhile, published a version of the letter in which the prime minister accused President Hadi of corruption. Its authenticity could not be confirmed.
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Re: Yemen

Postby Endovelico » Tue Jan 20, 2015 5:29 pm

Houthi rebels shelling Yemen president’s home
Presidential palace in capital Sana’a also seized, says army commander who describes events as coup
The Guardian, Tuesday 20 January 2015 16.07 GMT

Shia Houthi rebels are shelling the home of Yemen’s president in the capital, Sana’a, after seizing the presidential palace, according to the country’s information minister.

The minister, Nadia al-Sakkaf, posted on her Twitter account on Tuesday that President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi’s home has come under “heavy shelling since 3:00 PM by armed forces positioned over rooftops facing his house”.

Hadi is believed to be inside the house, which is in another part of the city to the presidential palace.

The shelling is a dramatic escalation in the violence that has gripped Sana’a since Monday.

Colonel Saleh al-Jamalani, the commander of the Presidential Protection Force that guards the embattled president, has described the events as a “coup”. He told the Associated Press that the rebels who entered the presidential palace were aided by insiders and were looting arms depots in the palace grounds.

Witnesses said there was a brief clash between Houthi forces and palace guards. They also said they saw the Houthis seize armoured vehicles that had been guarding the entrances.

UN secretary general Ban Ki-moon condemned the latest clashes, calling for an end to all hostilities and the immediate restoration of order.

“The secretary general is gravely concerned about the deteriorating situation in Yemen,” the UN press office said in a statement. “He deplores the heavy fighting between Ansarallah [Houthi] armed groups and Yemeni presidential guards throughout Sana’a.”

The UN security council has met behind closed doors to discuss the crisis.

The Houthis fought artillery battles with the army near the presidential palace on Monday in some of the most intense fighting in Sana’a in years, and surrounded the prime minister’s residence.

Nine people were killed and 90 wounded before a ceasefire came into force on Monday evening.

Yemen has been wracked by instability since an uprising forced leader Ali Abdullah Saleh from power in 2012.

In November the security council imposed sanctions on Saleh and two allied Houthi commanders for threatening peace in the country.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jan/20/houthi-rebels-seize-yemen-presidential-palace


Another big victory for Obama and the US foreign policy, and another huge defeat for Iran which will now have to "deal" with another "unfriendly" Shiite regime just next door to Saudi...
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Re: Yemen

Postby Endovelico » Wed Jan 28, 2015 10:14 pm

Obama remains very popular in Yemen...

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Re: Yemen

Postby Parodite » Thu Mar 26, 2015 12:05 pm

The Guardian:

Saudi Arabia launches Yemen air strikes as alliance builds against Houthi rebels

White House confirms support for military effort, claiming international mandate to end ‘widespread instability and chaos’ that drove Yemeni president into exile


DEBKAfile claims Egyptian involvement:

Egypt seizes Bab el Mandeb ahead of Iran. Saudis bomb Iran-backed Yemeni Houthis. US launches air strikes over Tikrit:

[...] DEBKAfile’s military sources report from the Gulf. Egypt disguised the raid as a counter-piracy operation. It rounded off the Saudi-led air strikes launched the same morning against Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen. These operations signaled the start of a major Sunni Arab revolt against Iran’s approaching takeover of Yemen, through its Houthi proxy, and advances in other strategic positions in the Middle East, with Washington’s support.
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Re: Yemen

Postby Endovelico » Fri Mar 27, 2015 4:40 pm

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Re: Yemen

Postby Endovelico » Fri Mar 27, 2015 11:42 pm

Yemeni resistance forces have downed a fighter jet in the Bani Ziad region north of Yemen’s capital city of Sana'a, the al-Masirah satellite television station says.

http://www.presstv.com/Detail/2015/03/27/403633/Fighter-jet-downed-near-Yemens-Sanaa


The first of many, one would expect...
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Re: Yemen

Postby Typhoon » Sat Mar 28, 2015 7:15 am

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[Credit: KAL | Economist]
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Re: Yemen

Postby Endovelico » Sat Mar 28, 2015 11:25 am

U.S. Rescues Saudi Pilots from Crashed Fighter Jet
Two airmen rescued from Gulf of Aden after F-15 went down
By Julian E. Barnes

WASHINGTON—The U.S. rescued two Saudi Arabian airmen from the Gulf of Aden after their two-seater F-15 fighter jet crashed [Translation: was shot down...] Thursday, a U.S. defense official said Friday.


Warning: The source of this is the Wall Street Journal (http://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-rescues ... 1427502224) not RT. So we may assume it is true... ;)
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Re: Yemen

Postby Heracleum Persicum » Sun Mar 29, 2015 6:28 am

.


ATOL



.

It is useful to refresh memory that Yemen and Saudi Arabia have scores to settle.

Iran may not have to do much to see that the Saudis end up in a quagmire.

I feel Iran anticipates such an eventuality. Iran will never get involved directly in Yemen.

Historically, Iran’s relations with Yemen have been patchy. But Yemen matters to Iran because Shi’ite empowerment in yet another country brings the tsunami to the Saudi doorstep.

By the way, the Houthis are hardened fighters and they will be fighting for their homeland.

They don’t need Iranian advisers.

They will be highly motivated. They have a long border with Saudi Arabia.

Besides, Yemeni tribal politics is incredibly complex.

As you know, Saudis had thought that former President Ali Abdullah Saleh was their man, but now they realize that he is with the Houthis.

How fast the alignments changed !

As for the Pakistani role, to my mind (and information), Bruce Riedel didn’t read the tea leaves correctly as regards Nawaz Sharif’s summons to travel to Riyadh post-haste a month ago.The Sharif family has massive business interests in Saudi Arabia and Sharif is in no position to defy the Saudi diktat.

Apart from Pakistan, there is no other participant who is capable of fighting a protracted guerrilla war.

Kuwait, UAE, Tunisia, Jordan ? You must be joking.

Egypt is barely coping with the Sinai.

And even for Pakistan, once the body bags begin returning to Pakistan, it remains to be seen how long Sharif can remain impervious to Pakistan’s own interests. Money cannot have the final say.

The only solution will be a UN mediation to have a consensus reached on power-sharing, which is what Iran and Russia are aiming at.

But if the Saudis press ahead, there is going to be big trouble ahead.

And for a UN role, US will have to take Russian help. That will be a bitter pill to swallow for Washington.

.


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Re: Yemen

Postby Heracleum Persicum » Sun Mar 29, 2015 6:56 pm

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WiKi : Ancient history of Yemen



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Sassanid period (570–630 CE)

The Persian king Khosrau I, sent troops under the command of Vahriz, who helped the semi-legendary Sayf ibn Dhi Yazan to drive the Aksumites out of Yemen.

Southern Arabia became a Persian dominion under a Yemenite vassal and thus came within the sphere of influence of the Sassanid Empire.

Later another army was sent to Yemen, and in 597/8 Southern Arabia became a province of the Sassanid Empire under a Persian satrap.


It was a Persian province by name but after the Persians assassinated Dhi Yazan, Yemen divided into a number of autonomous kingdoms.

This development was a consequence of the expansionary policy pursued by the Sassanian king Khosrau II Parviz (590-628), whose aim was to secure Persian border areas such as Yemen against Roman/Byzantine incursions.

Following the death of Khosrau II in 628, then the Persian governor in Southern Arabia, Badhan, converted to Islam and Yemen followed the new religion.

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Re: Yemen

Postby Doc » Mon Mar 30, 2015 3:05 am

Endovelico wrote:
U.S. Rescues Saudi Pilots from Crashed Fighter Jet
Two airmen rescued from Gulf of Aden after F-15 went down
By Julian E. Barnes

WASHINGTON—The U.S. rescued two Saudi Arabian airmen from the Gulf of Aden after their two-seater F-15 fighter jet crashed [Translation: was shot down...] Thursday, a U.S. defense official said Friday.


Warning: The source of this is the Wall Street Journal (http://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-rescues ... 1427502224) not RT. So we may assume it is true... ;)



Ahh Soooo what ? It was "shot down" because you translated English into English propaganda?
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Re: Yemen

Postby kmich » Tue Mar 31, 2015 3:59 pm

Make No Mistake — the United States Is at War in Yemen

- Micah Zenko

The Obama administration revealed that the United States was participating in yet another Middle East military intervention via a press release from the spokesperson of the National Security Council (NSC). This time, it’s Yemen. Late Wednesday evening, March 25, the White House posted a statement declaring: “President Obama has authorized the provision of logistical and intelligence support to GCC [Gulf Cooperation Council]-led military operations.”

There was no prime-time address by the president or secretary of defense — the only two people in the national command authority who can lawfully direct the U.S. military to engage in hostilities. There was no statement from the Department of Defense, the federal agency responsible for those armed forces providing the support to the GCC, or comment from U.S. Central Command, the combatant command whose geographic area of responsibility includes the GCC members and Yemen itself. Rather, the NSC spokesperson simply let us know.

U.S. officials subsequently emphasized that aiding partner countries in their intervention into Yemen is simply “providing enabling support,” as Brig. Gen. Michael Fantini, Middle East principal director of the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs, told a House hearing last week. And the NSC made it clear that “U.S. forces are not taking direct military action in Yemen.”

Yet, make no mistake, the United States is a combatant in this intervention.

The United States is providing targeting intelligence, as the Wall Street Journal reported: “American military planners are using live intelligence feeds from surveillance flights over Yemen to help Saudi Arabia decide what and where to bomb, U.S. officials said.” These video feeds are being provided via U.S. drones, because American manned aircraft are reportedly not presently flying over Yemeni airspace. (One needs to ask: Did U.S.-supplied video feeds help to direct the airstrikes that have caused civilian casualties?) Either way, the aid is clearly above and beyond “logistics” and “intelligence”: The Saudi Defense Ministry announced a U.S. search-and-rescue mission by a HH-60 helicopter flying from Djibouti of two Saudi pilots who ejected from their F-15SA over the Gulf of Aden. Oh, and the United States is also reportedly providing aerial refueling for Saudi fighter aircraft.

This has become a routine pattern for a president who declared in his 2013 inaugural address, “a decade of war is now ending.” The Obama administration has initiated (in Libya and Syria/Iraq) and extended (in Afghanistan) military operations with virtually no public debate or formal role for Congress — a situation that the American people and their elected representatives have tacitly accepted in repeated interventions and in the war on terrorism more generally.

But even though Code Pink isn’t marching on the Mall against the “enabling” of the Yemen campaign, it’s probably still worth trying to understand and evaluate the logic and objectives of the U.S. military support for the Saudi-led intervention.

A military operation that lacks clear courses of action, coherent objectives, or an intended end state is nothing more than the random, purposeless application of force against some enemy.

Like all military interventions, there have been many — at times contradictory — justifications offered by U.S. officials. The NSC claimed the purpose was to “defend Saudi Arabia’s border and to protect Yemen’s legitimate government.” The State Department suggested that the intent was “to promote a peaceful political transition and share their concerns about the aggressive actions of the Houthis,” stating on March 27 that the United States backed the GCC because “they are responding to a request from President [Abed Rabbo Mansour] Hadi, who is the legitimate president of Yemen.” (Presumably, the Obama administration would not support an intervention in Egypt to restore its democratically elected president, Mohamed Morsi.)

And then the White House weighed in, with deputy press secretary Eric Schultz first framing the purpose of the campaign as being “to defend Saudi Arabia’s border” and prevent the establishment of an al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula safe haven. Later, press secretary No. 1, Josh Earnest, shifted the message, claiming that the purpose was “to try to bring all of the sides, who are in pretty stark disagreement in Yemen, around the negotiating table to try to stabilize the situation in that country.” It is unclear who will sit around this table, since there have been no apparent efforts by the GCC, U.N. Special Envoy for Yemen Jamal Benomar, or Houthi representatives to commence these negotiations.

Meanwhile, on Capitol Hill, legislators tried to frame the issue as friend versus foe. Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.) stated that intervention was needed because the Arab countries “can’t allow Iran to take a foothold in Yemen…. We call them Houthis, but this is Iran,” said Burr, oversimplifying the matter. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) emphasized the need to “have the Saudis’ back … because that may give the Saudis some comfort that, even if we do reach an agreement with Iran on its nuclear program, that doesn’t mean that we’re not going to be willing to confront Iran as it tries to expand its quite nefarious influence.” Rep. John Boehner (R-Ohio) claimed the intent was “to protect [Saudi Arabia’s] homeland and to protect their own neighborhood.” Finally, Rep. Ed Royce (R-Calif.) endorsed the U.S. assistance on the most general justification of all: The civil war was “threatening the national security interests of our regional partners and the United States.”

At least the Pentagon wasn’t trying to make things up. Gen. Lloyd Austin, commander of Central Command, was frank when asked what the purpose of the campaign was, stating, “I don’t currently know the specific goals and objectives of the Saudi campaign, and I would have to know that to be able to assess the likelihood of success.” Despite the astonishing acknowledgment that he did not know why the intervention was occurring and was only given a few hours’ advance notice, Austin declared himself “very encouraged that we have seen what we’ve seen here.”

What is notable is that Saudi Arabia has made little mention of protecting its borders, with its ambassador to the United States, Adel al-Jubeir, stating that the purpose of the intervention was “to protect the people of Yemen from a radical organization that has allied with Iran and Hezbollah that has virtually taken over the country. It’s to defend the legitimate government of Yemen. And it’s to open up the way for political talks, so that Yemen can complete its transition period and move towards a better place.” Jubeir also declared of this proxy war: “I wouldn’t call it a proxy war because we are doing this to protect Yemen.”

So let’s recap, shall we? The United States is providing operational support to the Saudi-led intervention in Yemen to: 1) defend the borders of and prove its commitment to Saudi Arabia; 2) deny al Qaeda a safe haven; 3) protect Yemeni civilians; 4) make GCC members comfortable with a negotiated settlement to Iran’s nuclear program; 5) halt the expansion of Iranian influence generally; 6) protect the interests of nearby countries; and 7) foster a peaceful political transition of the Yemeni government back to power.

All of this despite the fact that the U.S. military commander for the region is unaware of the “specific goals and objectives” of those countries bombing Yemen. This is preposterous.

Remarkably, the administration still defends Obama’s claim that the “strategy of taking out terrorists who threaten us, while supporting partners on the front lines, is one that we have successfully pursued in Yemen.” [Italics added — and needed.] The White House spokesperson said this statement holds because “Yemen is not a nation-building strategy; it’s a counterterrorism strategy,” while the State Department added, “It’s a success and it has been a success for many years because of our efforts to push back and counter [al Qaeda] in Yemen.” Beyond these two on-the-record mouthpieces, you’d be hard-pressed to find anyone within the U.S. government who would agree off the record. Those drones that once took out terrorists now feed full-motion video to Saudi targeteers. And that front-line partner in the fight against al Qaeda, President Hadi, is in exile in Riyadh. That sure doesn’t look like a strategy successfully pursued.

To see Yemen exclusively through the lens of U.S. counterterrorism goals, and thus deem it a foreign-policy “success,” is not only insensitive to the chaos Yemenis are experiencing, it is incredibly shortsighted — if not downright disingenuous.

It is entirely implausible that the seven-course buffet of justifications and objectives will be achieved in Yemen. Oh, and there’s one more falsehood that we’re being fed: This will all be over soon. State Department spokesman Jeff Rathke pronounced on Friday: “We don’t want this to be an open-ended military campaign.” Of course, nobody wants that, though the leaders of the bombing campaign have pledged it will not end until the Houthis simply surrender and disarm. No doubt, much of the military and civilian infrastructure being destroyed will have to be rebuilt — in effect, nation-building again.

As Fred Iklé wrote in his 1971 classic Every War Must End, “[I]t is the outcome of the war, not the outcome of the campaigns within it, that determines how well their plans serve the nation’s interests.” The manner and speed with which the Obama administration decided to wholly back one side in Yemen’s latest proxy civil war — with no clear outcome — should be alarming. Unfortunately, this has become standard operating procedure for how the United States keeps going to war.
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Re: Yemen

Postby Heracleum Persicum » Wed Apr 01, 2015 2:26 am





By attacking the Houthis,
the Saudis and their allies are taking on the only indigenous group in Yemen confronting al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula,

an ally of the Islamic State



Yes, true, "kmich", America is in bed with ISIS, Wahhabi and Sallafi .. Iran just an excuse

Iran is the only real power fighting ISIS

Turkey, Qatar, Saudi, America all in bed with ISIS


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Re: Yemen

Postby Heracleum Persicum » Wed Apr 01, 2015 2:37 am

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Yemeni Army’s 117th Brigade loyal to the former Yemeni President Ali Saleh
handed positions guarding the "Bab el-Mandeb Straits" waterway
to two Houthi commando battalions



Mossad News agency reports "Houthi" securing the "Bab el-Mandeb Straits" waterway from ISIS terrorist

Things in good hands, Doc :lol:


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Re: Yemen

Postby Doc » Wed Apr 01, 2015 3:04 am

Heracleum Persicum wrote:.


Yemeni Army’s 117th Brigade loyal to the former Yemeni President Ali Saleh
handed positions guarding the "Bab el-Mandeb Straits" waterway
to two Houthi commando battalions



Mossad News agency reports "Houthi" securing the "Bab el-Mandeb Straits" waterway from ISIS terrorist

Things in good hands, Doc :lol:


.


Yeap the US and Chinese navies will be patrolling the red sea in no time to prevent shipping from being sunk.
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Re: Yemen

Postby Heracleum Persicum » Wed Apr 01, 2015 3:53 am

Doc wrote:
Heracleum Persicum wrote:.


Yemeni Army’s 117th Brigade loyal to the former Yemeni President Ali Saleh
handed positions guarding the "Bab el-Mandeb Straits" waterway
to two Houthi commando battalions



Mossad News agency reports "Houthi" securing the "Bab el-Mandeb Straits" waterway from ISIS terrorist

Things in good hands, Doc :lol:


.


Yeap the US and Chinese navies will be patrolling the red sea in no time to prevent shipping from being sunk.

.


No need, Doc .. Iranian Navy and "two Houthi commando battalions" will take of things .. it's smooth sailin

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Re: Yemen

Postby Doc » Wed Apr 01, 2015 4:32 am

Heracleum Persicum wrote:
Doc wrote:
Heracleum Persicum wrote:.


Yemeni Army’s 117th Brigade loyal to the former Yemeni President Ali Saleh
handed positions guarding the "Bab el-Mandeb Straits" waterway
to two Houthi commando battalions



Mossad News agency reports "Houthi" securing the "Bab el-Mandeb Straits" waterway from ISIS terrorist

Things in good hands, Doc :lol:


.


Yeap the US and Chinese navies will be patrolling the red sea in no time to prevent shipping from being sunk.

.


No need, Doc .. Iranian Navy and "two Houthi commando battalions" will take of things .. it's smooth sailin

.



Sure they will Though suez bound shipping will be sinking there after. But one thing How are those dingys that the Iranian navy uses as attack vessels going to get there?
The classes and the races to weak to master the new conditions of life must give way {..} They must perish in the revolutionary holocaust --Karl Marx
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Re: Yemen

Postby Heracleum Persicum » Wed Apr 01, 2015 5:08 am

Doc wrote:.

But one thing How are those dingys that the Iranian navy uses as attack vessels going to get there ?




Fair question

Well, those days of "BISMARCK" sinking "HOOD" behind us

Now, everything is "asymmetric" .. "C-802 radar-guided anti-shipping missile" best fired from "DINGY"


Haaretz


.

Hezbollah missile strikes Navy warship; four killed

By Amos Harel | Jul. 16, 2006 | 12:00 AM


The Israel Navy warship damaged on Friday night 16 kilometers off the Lebanese coast was hit by a missile fired by the Hezbollah.

..

The incident occured close to 8 P.M., west of Beirut, when the INS Spear, a Saar-5 Class destroyer, was on patrol as part of the naval blockade imposed on Lebanon since Wednesday.

The Saar-5 class is equipped with very advanced defensive systems.

..

Hezbollah Secretary General Hassan Nasrallah announced the strike on the Saar-5 ship immediately after it was carried out, in a telephone interview to Hezbollah television station Al Manar.

"You asked for total war, you will get total war to Haifa and beyond... and the surprises I mentioned have already began," he said in the interview.

.


This 20 yr old Iranian technology .. now, Iranian Navy anti ship missile, similar to "exocet", or ballistic, can hit 250+ km offshore vessels, best fired from "dingy"

Big vessels sittin duck

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Re: Yemen

Postby Doc » Wed Apr 01, 2015 7:58 am

Heracleum Persicum wrote:
Doc wrote:.

But one thing How are those dingys that the Iranian navy uses as attack vessels going to get there ?




Fair question

Well, those days of "BISMARCK" sinking "HOOD" behind us

Now, everything is "asymmetric" .. "C-802 radar-guided anti-shipping missile" best fired from "DINGY"


Haaretz


.

Hezbollah missile strikes Navy warship; four killed

By Amos Harel | Jul. 16, 2006 | 12:00 AM


The Israel Navy warship damaged on Friday night 16 kilometers off the Lebanese coast was hit by a missile fired by the Hezbollah.

..

The incident occured close to 8 P.M., west of Beirut, when the INS Spear, a Saar-5 Class destroyer, was on patrol as part of the naval blockade imposed on Lebanon since Wednesday.

The Saar-5 class is equipped with very advanced defensive systems.

..

Hezbollah Secretary General Hassan Nasrallah announced the strike on the Saar-5 ship immediately after it was carried out, in a telephone interview to Hezbollah television station Al Manar.

"You asked for total war, you will get total war to Haifa and beyond... and the surprises I mentioned have already began," he said in the interview.

.


This 20 yr old Iranian technology .. now, Iranian Navy anti ship missile, similar to "exocet", or ballistic, can hit 250+ km offshore vessels, best fired from "dingy"

Big vessels sittin duck

.


Which makes my point TYVM
The classes and the races to weak to master the new conditions of life must give way {..} They must perish in the revolutionary holocaust --Karl Marx
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Re: Yemen

Postby Endovelico » Wed Apr 01, 2015 10:17 am

Khamenei sends Iranian navy to Bab el-Mandeb Straits
DEBKAfile Exclusive Report March 31, 2015, 10:36 PM (IDT)

Control of the Red Sea Bab el-Mandeb Straits passed Tuesday, March 31 to pro-Iranian Yemeni forces when the Yemeni Army’s 117th Brigade loyal to the former Yemeni President Ali Saleh handed positions guarding the waterway to two Houthi commando battalions trained by Iranian Revolutionary Guards. This is revealed by debkafile’s military and intelligence sources.

In another development Tuesday involving Iran’s spreading tentacles, debkafile’s military sources reveal that unidentified aircraft bombed Burak, a small military base in the Fezzan province of southwestern Libya, which serves Iran as a transit store for arms purchased in Sudan for the Palestinian Hamas.

The weapons, which recently reached the Libyan base through Chad, were destroyed. They were scheduled to be smuggled through Egypt and Sinai and onto Gaza. Western military sources attributed responsibility for the bombardment to the Egyptian or Israeli air forces. Both Israel and Egypt have declined to comment on the report.

To strengthen Iran’s grip on the key Red Sea gateway, Iran’s supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has ordered two naval task forces to sail to the Red Sea. They are to fend off a Saudi-Egyptian offensive to dislodge the Houthi battalions now holding a point linking the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean and Persian Gulf.

The naval task forces are being sent to draw a sea shield around the Houthi forces to defend them against Saudi-Egyptian assaults. This maneuver was orchestrated by the Al Qods Brigades chief Gen. Qassem Soleimani.

Our sources report that the 33rd task force set out on its mission Tuesday night from the Gulf port of Bandar Abbas.

http://www.debka.com/article/24500/Khamenei-sends-Iranian-navy-to-Bab-el-Mandeb-Straits-Iran-arms-store-for-Hamas-bombed-in-Libya


DEBKAfile is not the most reliable source but if this is correct than we may have some interesting developments in the near future. Time to find out how good are the new Iranian armed forces?...
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Re: Yemen

Postby Azrael » Sat Apr 11, 2015 8:18 pm

What I don't get is why even get involved in a war between Zaidis and Sunnis.

Al Qaeda occupies a significant area of Yemen. Deal with that.

Some local tribes are fighting against Al Qaeda. We could assist with Special Forces, Airstrikes and perhaps Marines near the coast. They could be based out of a carrier group, possibly with an amphib assault boat to two.
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Re: Yemen

Postby Heracleum Persicum » Sun Apr 12, 2015 2:26 am

Azrael wrote:.

What I don't get is why even get involved in a war between Zaidis and Sunnis.

Al Qaeda occupies a significant area of Yemen. Deal with that.

Some local tribes are fighting against Al Qaeda. We could assist with Special Forces, Airstrikes and perhaps Marines near the coast. They could be based out of a carrier group, possibly with an amphib assault boat to two.

.



Good question, Azrael, good question

Well, why you think is that the case ?

Only logic explanation is, Al Qaeda not considered an enemy by Saudi and Sunni Sheikhs and Americans, rather Iran and Zaidis are the enemy

There is no other explanation.

One must only remember that Ossama AND ISIS were Western creation, Ossama to counter USSR and ISIS to counter Iran.






Despite Pakistan financially dependent on Saudi, “The Pakistan parliament desires that Pakistan should maintain neutrality in the Yemen conflict.

What does it mean ? ?

It means Pakistan knows this will end bad for Saudi and Sheiks

Oil price could shoot up any moment .. 100+ oil, here we come :lol:


.
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Re: Yemen

Postby Heracleum Persicum » Sun Apr 12, 2015 5:35 pm

.


Yemen war, beginning of plot to divide Saudi Arabia


“ The enemies of the [Middle East] region are unfortunately trying to disintegrate and weaken Saudi Arabia, and the aggression against Yemen and its consequences are the start point of this ominous plot, ”


Am sure this is the plan

West destroyed Saddam, Iran was the winner

West might now destroy KSA and all the Sheiks and Amirs, again Iran will be the winner

Probably West AND China and Russia want a strong Iran.

.
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Re: Yemen

Postby kmich » Sun Apr 19, 2015 1:46 am

What a mess.

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Re: Yemen

Postby Heracleum Persicum » Sun Apr 19, 2015 4:52 am

kmich wrote:.


What a mess.



.



Thank you kmich for posting it

Watched it .. others should watch it too

My comment as follows

- This a civil war between north and south

- Western policy of last 100 yrs in Middle East has distorted natural developments of tribes and cultures .. Western backing of Christians in Lebanon leading to marginalization of Lebanese Shia lead directly to Shias now dominating Lebanon

- Western backing of Wahhabi/Salafi "Al Saud" lead to marginalization of (Shia) Houthi in Yemen .. now the Houthi want their own power

- For 1000s of yrs, all tribes have lived in harmony in Yemen .. now KSA meddling in "civil war" between north and south .. this could bring the war to KSA, to Shias in KSA

- West should act "neutral" as this a "civil war" for Houthi independence

- West siding with Sunni/KSA benefits only Al Ghaida & ISIS as the Frontline documents

- If west handles things badly, West, KSA, Persian Golf Sheiks will be the big losers

- A partition of Yemen big probability

- No matter what, Iran will be the winner


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