Venezuela

Now the robbers go after food trucks

Postby monster_gardener » Sun Jan 25, 2015 11:55 pm

Typhoon wrote:FP | For Venezuelans, the Fall in Oil Prices is Personal

Thanks to a combination of lower oil prices and an economic policy based on rigid price and currency controls, the scarcity of basic staples such as toilet paper, beef, chicken, and cooking oil has never been worse. People spend hours in line hoping to purchase essential items, but they’re rarely successful.

Even though final 2014 figures on the Venezuelan economy have yet to be made public, we do know a few things about the shape it’s in. Inflation closed at around 70 percent for the year. The country is in recession: GDP is expected to have dropped by around 4 percent once the numbers are in. The price of oil, which accounts for about 96 percent of the country’s exports, has dropped by about 60 percent since June.



Thank You VERY MUCH for your post, Typhoon.....

It's gotten so bad that the robbers are going after the food trucks...

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/robbers-targe ... 12857.html
SAN CRISTOBAL/CARACAS (Reuters) - Robbers and looters are targeting trucks carrying food across Venezuela in another sign of worsening shortages that have turned basics like flour and chicken into coveted booty.

Crime has long plagued shops and roads in Venezuela, which has one of the world's highest murder rates.

But widespread shortages due to a restriction of dollars for imports have worsened since the New Year.

This has made food delivery increasingly risky even as certain trucks have been fitted with GPS devices and are sometimes protected by private security agents.

"I won't transport food anymore because the streets are too dangerous," said Orlando Garcia, a 37-year-old driver from the western state of Tachira who has been ambushed twice as he crisscrossed the country.

"They put screws on the road (to burst your tires), and when you stop to fix the tire they attack you," said Garcia, who now refuses to work past midnight and will only transport plastics.

A woman stands next to empty shelves inside a Makro supermarket in Caracas. (Reuters)A woman stands next to empty shelves inside a Makro supermarket in Caracas. (Reuters)

Queues that stretch around blocks are now a common sight throughout the OPEC country. Armed National Guard troops have been deployed to maintain order, but frustration mounts quickly during hours-long waits under the Caribbean sun.

"It's become a security problem to bring trucks to big supermarket stores," said Arsenio Manzanares, who heads a Venezuelan truckers' union.

"This wasn't a problem before, but now with these queues, people see a truck and they lunge for it."

Local media have reported several food robberies in Caracas this month, including one by four armed thieves who stole canned tuna, corn flour and refined sugar......
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Re: Venezuela

Postby YMix » Tue Feb 17, 2015 3:22 pm

Coup plot foiled in Venezuela
By Gloria La Riva
Feb 15, 2015

A coup plot against President Nicolas Maduro and the Bolivarian Revolution was thwarted this week as a retired Venezuelan Air Force general and 10 military and civilian opposition figures were arrested.

The bombing of the Presidential Palace, the National Assembly, Telesur TV network, the Defense Ministry and other Caracas sites was to take place February 12, the one-year anniversary of violent anti-government attacks known as “guarimbas,” which caused 43 deaths. A Tucano EMB 312 bomber would have been flown by renegade Air Force First Lieutenant José Antich Zapata to destroy the targeted sites.

U.S. spokesperson Jen Psaki and the Venezuelan far-right are dismissing the plot claim, but video evidence, a map of the bombing targets, and other key evidence have been unveiled on national television, with more details promised. Washington’s role in previous plots has been proven before.

According to President Maduro, detained coup leaders have confessed their role. He spoke on national television Sunday morning, to reveal more facts and accuse the United States government of conspiring with coup plotters.

Antich Zapata received U.S. visas for himself and other conspirators from the U.S. embassy in Caracas, for escape from Venezuela in case the plot failed.

Maduro also said that the script of an eight-minute video by the coup group – to air once the government was overthrown – was written with the help of a U.S. embassy advisor.

Rightwing opposition involved

In obvious preparation for the failed coup, three of the most belligerent opposition figures – Maria Corina Machado, Leopoldo Lopez and Antonio Ledezma – issued a “Call for a National Transition Agreement,” on February 11, the day before the overthrow was to take place. Lopez is currently awaiting trial for his role in the violent attacks last February.

The “transition agreement” is a plan for overthrow of the Bolivarian Revolution socialist project, including a demand for felony trials of current government leaders after the “transition,” the privatization of nationalized industries, and the takeover of PDVSA, the state-owned oil industry that has been the source of great social developments in Venezuela since 1999.

As if aware of a pending coup, German embassy representative Jorg Polster issued a letter of warning on February 5 to German citizens residing in Venezuela, to take unusual precautions such as in the event of “political unrest like that which began in the spring of 2014.” The letter suggests the German nationals obtain a two-week supply of food, water and emergency provisions of battery, radio and important documents. The letter also indicates a loss of electricity and Internet access could be a possibility.

National Assembly president Diosdado Cabello and Jorge Rodriguez, mayor of the Libertador municipality of Caracas – both leaders of Maduro’s political high command – also appeared on television, denouncing Julio Borges, leader of the right-wing group, Primero Justicia (“Justice First” in English), as drafting the list of the 20-plus targets to be bombed.

An unfolding plot since January

A series of actions was planned by the counterrevolutionaries to lead up to February 12.

First step was economic destabilization through major corporate hoarding of goods to create empty stores and mass discontent. That has been taking place for weeks, with the right-wing then accusing the socialist government of economic failure.

The government countered with “Operation Dignity,” confiscating the hoarded goods for redistribution at fair prices to the population, and arresting the corporate conspirators.

The second step was internationally-generated false accusations of a “humanitarian crisis” in Venezuela by the U.S. and international allies of Washington.

It is thus no coincidence that on January 24, three right-wing former presidents of Latin American countries, Andres Pastrana of Colombia, Felipe Calderon of Mexico and Sebastian Pinera of Chile came to Venezuela and tried to visit jailed opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez. Afterwards, they demanded his freedom and held a press conference accusing Venezuela of human rights violations.

On February 3, President Maduro warned Washington to stop its interventionist meddling, and accused U.S. officials of trying to bribe current and former government leaders to betray the government.

Via Telesur, he denounced U.S. Vice President Joseph Biden’s recent meetings with various Latin American leaders, in which he told them Maduro’s government would soon fall, and that the Petrocaribe program would be ended. Biden advised them to “keep Venezuela isolated.” Petrocaribe is the Venezuelan program that provides oil to Caribbean nations at a low price.

Telesur as target

Why was Telesur one of the targets to be bombed?

In 2002, when a fascist coup by a sector of the military and corporate opposition overthrew President Hugo Chavez from April 11 to 13, Venezuela’s revolution was new and a people’s media had not yet developed.

In the critical hours of the massive and spontaneous popular mobilization to demand Chavez’s release and return as president, the monopoly corporate media completely blocked out the news. It was clear that the Bolivarian process needed a revolutionary media to transmit vital information to the population.

Since then, dozens of community and television stations have been established; corporate violators of the new Communications Law have had their licenses revoked.

The Telesur network – promoting the integration of Latin America – was proposed 10 years ago by Chavez. It has become a vital conveyor of national and international information with a solid anti-imperialist prospective.

It provided uncensored live coverage and exposed the terror bombing by NATO/U.S. bombing of Libya.

Like the brutal bombing of Serbia’s national TV station, killing scores of journalists who courageously covered the criminal NATO/U.S. bombing of Yugoslavia in 1999, the planned bombing of Telesur was part of the plan to destroy the Revolution and install a fascist coup.

The smashing of this latest plot against Venezuela is a major blow to U.S. imperialism’s attempts to reverse the gains of the Bolivarian revolutionary process in Venezuela, the Cuban Revolution and all progress in Latin America.

Revolutionary mass organizations and the military high command are declaring their unity and defense of Venezuela’s Bolivarian Revolution.

Vladimir Padrino Lopez, the Minister of Defense and Strategic Operational Commander of the FANB, stood with a large group of high-ranking military officers to denounce the military plot. “The Bolivarian Armed Forces reiterates its support and loyalty to President Nicolás Maduro Moros and reaffirms its commitment to the will of the people, with the Plan of the Homeland, in the building of Socialism.”

More than ever, it is vital that international solidarity be mobilized to demand an end to U.S. machinations in Venezuela and all Latin America. Progressive groups and leaders in Latin America are expressing their support for Maduro’s government. From March 5-7, organizations in several cities in the United States plan actions in solidarity with the Venezuelan Bolivarian government and its people in struggle.

The danger is not over. The lessons of Latin America in the 1960s, 1970s and the U.S. war against revolutionary movements everywhere shows that the struggle must continue to defend Venezuela’s gains and oppose U.S. imperialism’s counter-revolutionary schemes.
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Re: Venezuela

Postby Doc » Fri Feb 20, 2015 3:13 am

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2015/02/19/world/americas/ap-lt-venezuela-mayor-arrestad.html

Caracas Mayor Who Opposed Government Beaten, Violently Arrested


By THE ASSOCIATED PRESSFEB. 19, 2015, 8:31 P.M. E.S.T.

CARACAS, Venezuela — National police in camouflage uniforms smashed into the office of Caracas Mayor Antonio Ledezma on Thursday and carried the opposition figure away. President Nicolas Maduro announced that the mayor would be punished for all his efforts to disturb the peace.

Reports of the arrest set off protests around the city, where people spontaneously banged pots from their windows or tapped rhythms on their car horns amid rush hour traffic. As night fell, hundreds gathered in front of the headquarters of the intelligence service police to vent their anger.

In a speech Thursday night, Maduro said the mayor had been "captured" and would face justice.

"He'll be held accountable for all his crimes," Maduro said in comments that TV and radio stations across the country were required to carry.

Last week, Maduro named Ledezma among a laundry list of government critics and Western powers he accused of plotting a coup to bring down the South American country's socialist government, one of more than a dozen such denunciations Maduro has made since taking power in 2013. Ledezma mocked the accusation in multiple interviews, saying the real destabilizing force in Venezuela was the government's corruption.

Tensions have been running high in Venezuela this week, with the one-year anniversary of the start weeks of anti-government street protests that choked the country with tear gas and smoke from flaming barricades and resulted in more than 40 deaths. National police arrested several other mayors and former mayors during last year's unrest, including Leopoldo Lopez, who is considered by human rights groups as Latin America's most high-profile political prisoner.

Human Rights Watch called for Ledezma's immediate release, while the U.S. State Department issued a statement saying Venezuela's accusations that the "United States is involved in coup plotting and destabilization are baseless and false."

Ledezma has been a thorn in the side of the ruling party since he won the mayorship in 2008, beating out a member of the socialist party led by the late President Hugo Chavez.

The government subsequently transferred nearly all of Ledezma's powers, including control of police and schools, to a newly created government entity. Ledezma responded with a hunger strike that drew international attention and cemented his status as symbol for what the opposition calls the government's efforts to marginalize elected officials who do not fall in line.

His arrest was captured on surveillance video, clips of which rocketed around social media. A throng of men in black and gray camouflage, wearing bulletproof vests, can be seen forcefully hustling the 59 year-old politician from his building.

A member of Ledezma's security team, who was not authorized to give his name, said 10 men wearing the uniform of Venezuela's national intelligence service entered the building carrying guns and a hatchet. They used their weapons to break the door to Ledezma's office, and then a dozen other men, wearing masks, came in and hit the mayor before dragging him away, he said.

Members of the mayor's team gave statements Thursday night amid the shattered glass of the office's front door. The rest of the office looked untouched.

Hector Urgelles, a spokesman for Ledezma's party, the Fearless People's Alliance, told The Associated Press that the uniformed men were presumably members of the intelligence service, but did not identify themselves or give a reason for the arrest.

Assemblyman Ismael Garcia wrote on Twitter that Ledezma was carried off "like a dog."
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Re: Venezuela

Postby Typhoon » Mon Mar 16, 2015 2:21 pm

Why Venezuela is the world’s worst performing economy, in three charts

Venezuela National Assembly Gives President Decree Powers

1/ Run the country's economy into the ground; and

2/ Blame it on external forces and assume dictatorial powers
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Re: Venezuela

Postby noddy » Tue Mar 17, 2015 12:21 am

whenever i think australia has mismanaged its resource boom (it most certainly has) i look at venezuela and remind myself just how much worse it could be.

cheap populism is expensive.
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Re: Venezuela

Postby Typhoon » Tue Mar 17, 2015 3:57 am

noddy wrote:whenever i think australia has mismanaged its resource boom (it most certainly has) i look at venezuela and remind myself just how much worse it could be.

cheap populism is expensive.


Indeed.

I recall reading that at the beginning of the 20th century there was a popular phrase "to be as rich as an Argentinian".
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Re: Venezuela

Postby Doc » Sat Mar 21, 2015 5:13 pm

Typhoon wrote:
noddy wrote:whenever i think australia has mismanaged its resource boom (it most certainly has) i look at venezuela and remind myself just how much worse it could be.

cheap populism is expensive.


Indeed.

I recall reading that at the beginning of the 20th century there was a popular phrase "to be as rich as an Argentinian".


They still say it But now it is a curse. :D
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Re: Venezuela

Postby Doc » Wed Apr 29, 2015 9:48 pm

Venezuela Rations Electricity, Blames Climate Change


by Frances Martel29 Apr 2015331

The Venezuelan government will begin rationing electrical supplies this week in response to high demand triggered by heat. Public employees will only have to work six hours a day until further notice, and police units will be sent to inspect private businesses to ensure they only use their allotted amounts. Venezuelan Vice President Jorge Arreaza blamed the measures on climate change.

El Universal reports that the rationing was described by Arreaza as a “preventive action” to avoid blackouts. The Venezuelan government is responsible for providing electricity in the socialist nation, and concerns that power is running out in the OPEC nation have triggered alarm that power may be next on a list of basic scarcities in Venezuela that include milk, laundry detergent, and vegetable oil.

Minister of Energy Jesse Chacón added that the limited hours on public sector jobs would not apply to necessary arms of the government, such as education, health, security, and garbage collection. Private industries are obligated to use 10% less energy across the board until further notice, without any exceptions mentioned in the original announcement. The new regulation permits government inspection of businesses specifically to monitor energy use, though the government has not specified what punishments await a business that defies the call.

Vice President Arreaza also made a bizarre call for the use of “autogenerated” electricity to reduce demand on the government’s plants. “Both the public sector as well as large [private] consumers should opt for autogeneration,” he said in the statement announcing the new plan. “That is to say, that they use their own equipment and plants to generate electricity, especially in peak hours, and not use the National System.”

The Wall Street Journal suggests that the call for self-generated electricity is an attempt to raise the demand for petroleum in the nation, as the price of that commodity has dropped significantly in the past year in Venezuela and worldwide. “During power shortages in the past, Venezuelans as well as businesses and industry have turned to fossil fuel-burning generators, causing a surge in demand for the country’s cheap gasoline,” the newspaper explains, adding that one American dollar can currently buy more than 500 gallons of gasoline in Venezuela. The government caused alarm in January by publicly considering raising the price of oil, which was at the time $0.002 a gallon. Oil prices in Venezuela dropped from $99 a barrel in June 2015 to $38 a barrel in January.

Arreaza blamed capitalism and climate change for the growing energy crisis. “This is, of course, linked to global warming and the excessive industrialization of capitalism, which never stops, nor has ever stopped, for the effects that it can have on the climate, on society and on Mother Earth,” Mr. Arreaza said in public statements quoted by The Wall Street Journal.

The Venezuelan government has blamed capitalism almost without fault in response to all the nation’s scarcities, though opponents of the socialist state suggest that government mismanagement is a far more significant factor in their economic decline. Venezuela boasts some of the largest oil reserves in the world, much of which is used to curry favor with Caribbean nations in exchange for public support. The result is a significant loss in resources that could have been sold at market prices or traded for the basic goods for which Venezuela installed ration cards in March 2014: cooking oil, flour, milk, and other household objects. At one point in the summer of 2014, the Venezuelan government was forced to begin rationing water. Supermarket lines to buy household items routinely last up to six hours as demand for products has failed to meet supply.


http://www.breitbart.com/national-secur ... te-change/
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Re: Venezuela

Postby Doc » Fri Oct 23, 2015 2:05 pm

Venezuela's economic miracle
Image
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Re: Venezuela

Postby Typhoon » Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am

Telegraph | Venezuela opposition thrashes 'Chavismo' in landslide win

Venezuela's opposition trounced the ruling Socialists on Sunday to win the legislature for the first time in 16 years and gain a long-sought platform to challenge President Nicolas Maduro's rule of the OPEC nation.

The opposition Democratic Unity coalition won 99 seats to the Socialists' 46 in the 167-national National Assembly, the election board said, with some districts still to be counted.
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Re: Venezuela

Postby Typhoon » Sat Jan 16, 2016 5:49 am

BBC | Venezuela economy: Nicolas Maduro declares emergency

The Venezuelan government has announced a 60-day economic emergency to deal with the country's worsening crisis.
President Nicolas Maduro will govern by decree for two months.
The edict includes tax increases and puts emergency measures in place to pay for welfare services and food imports.
The government's move came as official figures released by the central bank showed that the Venezuelan economy had contracted by 4.5% in the first nine months of 2015.
The emergency was declared hours before President Maduro delivers a State of the Nation address to Congress for the first time since his centre-right opponents took control of the legislature.
The decree also instilled more state controls on businesses, industrial productivity and on electronic currency transactions.


Endo sure could pick them . . .
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Re: Venezuela

Postby Typhoon » Thu Feb 04, 2016 12:46 am

FT | It could be too late to avoid catastrophe in Venezuela

As markets brace themselves for the negative effects of the decline in oil prices, Venezuela will probably be the first big domino to fall.

Domestically, the most likely scenario is an imminent economic collapse and a humanitarian crisis. Internationally, it will imply the largest and messiest emerging market sovereign default since the Argentine crisis of 2001. The situation is made worse by the inability of the political system, at present, to address the situation.

Why Venezuela? First, because while most other oil exporters used the boom to put some money aside, former president Hugo Chávez, who died in 2013, used it to quadruple the foreign debt. This allowed him to spend as if the average price of a barrel of oil was $197 in 2012, when in fact it was only $111. He also used it to maim the private sector through nationalisations and import controls. With the end of the boom, the country was put in a hopeless situation.
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Re: Venezuela

Postby noddy » Thu Feb 04, 2016 8:14 am

im sure it must be someone elses fault, perhaps a british american lizard jew banker with saudi connections.
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Re: Venezuela

Postby Doc » Thu Apr 28, 2016 4:04 am

Venezuela Doesn't Have Enough Money to Pay for Its Money
Andrew Rosati
andrewrosati
April 27, 2016 — 5:00 AM EDT
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Bloomberg’s QuickTake: Venezuela’s Revolution

Billions of new bills in circulation and still more are needed
Rampant inflation means gym bags full of cash for dinner

Venezuela’s epic shortages are nothing new at this point. No diapers or car parts or aspirin -- it’s all been well documented. But now the country is at risk of running out of money itself.

In a tale that highlights the chaos of unbridled inflation, Venezuela is scrambling to print new bills fast enough to keep up with the torrid pace of price increases. Most of the cash, like nearly everything else in the oil-exporting country, is imported. And with hard currency reserves sinking to critically low levels, the central bank is doling out payments so slowly to foreign providers that they are foregoing further business.

Venezuela, in other words, is now so broke that it may not have enough money to pay for its money.

This article is based on interviews with a dozen industry executives, diplomats and former officials as well as internal company and central bank documents. All of the companies declined official comment; the central bank did not respond to numerous requests for interviews and comment.


More at the link

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/ ... n-explodes
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Re: Venezuela

Postby Typhoon » Sat May 14, 2016 4:57 am

Reuters | Venezuela looters target chicken, flour amid worsening shortage

Mobs in Venezuela have stolen flour, chicken and even underwear this week as looting increases across the crisis-hit OPEC nation where many basic products have run short.

Many people now get up in the dead of night to spend hours in long lines in front of supermarkets. But as more end up empty-handed and black market prices soar, plundering is rising in Venezuela, already one of the world's most violent countries.


Tired of spending most their lives, living in an Endovelico paradise.
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Re: Venezuela

Postby noddy » Sun May 15, 2016 10:15 am

you know aswell as i do that it wont be socialisms fault.

conspiracy theories as to why fascist pigs wont sell product below cost go ere.
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Re: Venezuela

Postby Simple Minded » Wed May 18, 2016 12:28 pm

Typhoon wrote:Reuters | Venezuela looters target chicken, flour amid worsening shortage

Mobs in Venezuela have stolen flour, chicken and even underwear this week as looting increases across the crisis-hit OPEC nation where many basic products have run short.

Many people now get up in the dead of night to spend hours in long lines in front of supermarkets. But as more end up empty-handed and black market prices soar, plundering is rising in Venezuela, already one of the world's most violent countries.


Tired of spending most their lives, living in an Endovelico paradise.


Sounds like a little known novel I once read.... Alberto Shrugs
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Re: Venezuela

Postby noddy » Sun May 22, 2016 2:53 am

noddy wrote:you know aswell as i do that it wont be socialisms fault.

conspiracy theories as to why fascist pigs wont sell product below cost go ere.


http://venezuelanalysis.com/analysis/11985

their is so much thats just mindboggling about the socialist understanding of money as encapsulated by this article.

Measures were taken which limited the normal functioning of the free market capitalist economy in order to defend the revolution against the sabotage of the ruling class. These included foreign exchange controls (to prevent the flight of capital) and price controls on basic food products (to defend the purchasing power of the poor).

Soon, the capitalists found a way around this. Foreign exchange controls became a swindle and resulted in a massive transfer of hard currency from oil revenues directly into the pockets of unscrupulous capitalists. How did that happen? The government instituted a subsidised foreign exchange rate which was to be used to import basic products (food and medical supplies) as well as parts for industry.

Instead, private capitalists applied for preferential dollars which they then syphoned into the black market (which developed as an inevitable side effect of currency controls) or to offshore bank accounts. Thus we witnessed the incredible situation where imports in volume decreased, while imports in value (in dollars) massively increased.


i love analysis which says 'our policies caused chaos, we must double down on them'
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Re: Venezuela

Postby jerryberry » Mon Jun 13, 2016 7:48 pm

This has been the worst thing to watch. This country has been flushed down the toilet. I wondered why his holiness Chavez didn't call up one of the Nordic countries and ask for assistance in forming a functional socialist country. I assume that is what the country was voting for when they voted for Chavez.

Chavez reminded me of Senior Pepe.

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Re: Venezuela

Postby Typhoon » Sun Jun 19, 2016 8:38 pm

All who have served the Revolution have plowed the sea.

~ Simón Bolívar [1830]
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Re: Venezuela

Postby jerryberry » Thu Jul 21, 2016 4:00 pm

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Re: Venezuela

Postby Typhoon » Sun Sep 04, 2016 7:56 pm

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Re: Venezuela

Postby Typhoon » Fri Oct 28, 2016 2:55 am

AP | Mass protest in Venezuela demanding end of 'dictatorship'

CARACAS, Venezuela — Anti-government protesters jammed the streets of Venezuela's capital on Wednesday on the heels of a decision by congress to open a political trial against President Nicolas Maduro, whose allies have blocked moves for a recall election.

Tens of thousands of demonstrators shut down Caracas' main highway, and schools and shops were closed as protesters occupied other key points around the city to demand the ouster of Maduro, who many Venezuelans blame for triple-digit inflation and shortages of food, medicines and other basic goods.
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Re: Venezuela

Postby Typhoon » Mon Apr 10, 2017 7:03 am

When the votes hit your eye,
like a big pizza pie.
That's Venezuela.

Reuters | Venezuela Socialists' election strategy? Block adversaries

Venezuela's move to bar two-time presidential candidate Henrique Capriles from public office for 15 years looked like an unusually brazen blow at the opposition but is just the logical extension of a strategy that has emerged as the last, best hope of President Nicolas Maduro's Socialists for maintaining power.

A nearly identical manoeuvre was used ten years ago to halt the rise of former mayor Leopoldo Lopez, who in polls remains one of the most influential opposition leaders despite being jailed three years ago for his role in anti-government protests.

The situation suggests the Socialists may continue to lean on Comptroller Manuel Galindo, accused by the opposition of being a government puppet, to clear the playing field of potential challengers. The election, still unscheduled, must be held by the end of 2018.

Maduro is struggling under low approval ratings and Soviet-style product shortages, but so far the opposition has failed to find a way around the Socialists' domination of the top court and other state institutions that have found one excuse after another to sideline them.


To paraphrase the King of ID,

Hack: "El Presidente, the proletariat is revolting!"

El Presidente: "You can say that again. The ungrateful bastards."
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Re: Venezuela

Postby Simple Minded » Mon Apr 10, 2017 12:40 pm

Typhoon wrote:When the votes hit your eye,
like a big pizza pie.
That's Venezuela.

Reuters | Venezuela Socialists' election strategy? Block adversaries

Venezuela's move to bar two-time presidential candidate Henrique Capriles from public office for 15 years looked like an unusually brazen blow at the opposition but is just the logical extension of a strategy that has emerged as the last, best hope of President Nicolas Maduro's Socialists for maintaining power.

A nearly identical manoeuvre was used ten years ago to halt the rise of former mayor Leopoldo Lopez, who in polls remains one of the most influential opposition leaders despite being jailed three years ago for his role in anti-government protests.

The situation suggests the Socialists may continue to lean on Comptroller Manuel Galindo, accused by the opposition of being a government puppet, to clear the playing field of potential challengers. The election, still unscheduled, must be held by the end of 2018.

Maduro is struggling under low approval ratings and Soviet-style product shortages, but so far the opposition has failed to find a way around the Socialists' domination of the top court and other state institutions that have found one excuse after another to sideline them.


To paraphrase the King of ID,

Hack: "El Presidente, the proletariat is revolting!"

El Presidente: "You can say that again. The ungrateful bastards."


C'mon now typhoon, Endovelico said it was gonna work out fine...... and these are his people. Give them some more time.
"Speech is conveniently located midway between thought and action, where it often substitutes for both."
John Andrew Holmes
Simple Minded
 
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