Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Typhoon » Tue Oct 03, 2017 2:00 am

Doc wrote:http://electronics360.globalspec.com/article/9829/understanding-quantum-computing?id=%2D1388879479&uh=13ef97&email=seis%40xecu%2Enet&md=170926&mh=f9523c&Vol=Vol17Issue39&Pub=1&LinkId=1887708&keyword=link%5F1887708&et_rid=1672503464&et_mid=83538635&frmtrk=newsletter&cid=nl

Understanding Quantum Computing
Roger Pink
14 September 2017


From the comments section

Re: Understanding Quantum Computing
#1
jimbo3407
2017-Sep-26 10:26 AM

I think 2^N is incorrect. This is what a binary bit does.

2^8=256 would be 8 bits for a conventional computer.

Maybe N^N is right, but I'm not sure.

8^8=16,777,216

Any clarification?
Re: Understanding Quantum Computing
#2
bullardrr
2017-Sep-26 10:28 AM

I still do not understand quantum computing.

Re: Understanding Quantum Computing
#4
In reply to #2
Roadside
2017-Sep-26 7:36 PM

It has to do with the entanglement of the sub atomic particles.

There was an experiment that proved they behave differently when being measured to give you a more expected result.

The state of entanglement is the state of not being measured, this allows the SAP to act different.Not Be confined by our logic until the answer is produced.
Re: Understanding Quantum Computing
#3
Ulopes
2017-Sep-26 12:18 PM

Well... I don't understand quantum computing either, but if

"...N qubits are the equivalent of 2N bits of information.."

then 8 qubits = 28 bits = 256 bits = 2256 unique values
Re: Understanding Quantum Computing
#6
In reply to #3
jimbo3407
2017-Sep-27 11:36 AM

8 qubits = 28 bits = 256 bits = 2256 unique values

Thanks for that explanation; I looked at it for a while before the light can on.
Re: Understanding Quantum Computing
#5
bullardrr
2017-Sep-27 10:01 AM

One step at a time, starting with the thing in itself.

What is the identity of the q-bit subatomic particle?

Next,

How does one introduce/apply a logic code to a cause a unique non-binary presumably hyper-ephemeral dynamic entanglement of such particles?

We off and running down the Yellow Brick Road to taking quantum computing from alchemy to science.


That is what I love about sconce most of the time it raises more questions than it answers . :D


Always bemusing and a bit amusing to read a discussion in the comments section between posters who have no understanding
of what they are discussing.

Having said that, quantum computing is a field that I've almost completely ignored.

What I do know that the biggest challenge to building a working quantum computer is decoherence as discussed above.

Two resource sites for anyone interested in learning more:

http://www.theory.caltech.edu/~preskill ... ph219_2017

http://inst.eecs.berkeley.edu/~cs191/fa14/
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Simple Minded » Tue Oct 03, 2017 2:27 am

If this discussion is any indicator, it would seem that running a proper "climate science" model would require a Quantum computer......
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Typhoon » Sat Oct 14, 2017 10:41 pm

Cern Courier | Birth of a Symmetry

SU(2) x U(1)

Weinberg’s paper “A Model of Leptons”, published in Physical Review Letters (PRL) on 20 November 1967, determined the direction of high-energy particle physics through the final decades of the 20th century. Just two and a half pages long, it is one of the most highly cited papers in the history of theoretical physics. Its contents are the core of the Standard Model of particles physics, now almost half a century old and still passing every experimental test.


As was the case with his comments in Brussels the previous month, Weinberg’s paper appeared in November 1967 to a deafening silence. “Rarely has so great an accomplishment been so widely ignored,” wrote Sidney Coleman in Science in 1979. Today, Weinberg’s paper has been cited more than 10,000 times. Having been cited but twice in the four years from 1967 to 1971, suddenly it became so important that researchers have cited it three times every week throughout half a century. There is no parallel for this in the history of particle physics.
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Doc » Sun Oct 15, 2017 7:24 pm

Typhoon wrote:
Doc wrote:http://electronics360.globalspec.com/article/9829/understanding-quantum-computing?id=%2D1388879479&uh=13ef97&email=seis%40xecu%2Enet&md=170926&mh=f9523c&Vol=Vol17Issue39&Pub=1&LinkId=1887708&keyword=link%5F1887708&et_rid=1672503464&et_mid=83538635&frmtrk=newsletter&cid=nl

Understanding Quantum Computing
Roger Pink
14 September 2017


From the comments section

Re: Understanding Quantum Computing
#1
jimbo3407
2017-Sep-26 10:26 AM

I think 2^N is incorrect. This is what a binary bit does.

2^8=256 would be 8 bits for a conventional computer.

Maybe N^N is right, but I'm not sure.

8^8=16,777,216

Any clarification?
Re: Understanding Quantum Computing
#2
bullardrr
2017-Sep-26 10:28 AM

I still do not understand quantum computing.

Re: Understanding Quantum Computing
#4
In reply to #2
Roadside
2017-Sep-26 7:36 PM

It has to do with the entanglement of the sub atomic particles.

There was an experiment that proved they behave differently when being measured to give you a more expected result.

The state of entanglement is the state of not being measured, this allows the SAP to act different.Not Be confined by our logic until the answer is produced.
Re: Understanding Quantum Computing
#3
Ulopes
2017-Sep-26 12:18 PM

Well... I don't understand quantum computing either, but if

"...N qubits are the equivalent of 2N bits of information.."

then 8 qubits = 28 bits = 256 bits = 2256 unique values
Re: Understanding Quantum Computing
#6
In reply to #3
jimbo3407
2017-Sep-27 11:36 AM

8 qubits = 28 bits = 256 bits = 2256 unique values

Thanks for that explanation; I looked at it for a while before the light can on.
Re: Understanding Quantum Computing
#5
bullardrr
2017-Sep-27 10:01 AM

One step at a time, starting with the thing in itself.

What is the identity of the q-bit subatomic particle?

Next,

How does one introduce/apply a logic code to a cause a unique non-binary presumably hyper-ephemeral dynamic entanglement of such particles?

We off and running down the Yellow Brick Road to taking quantum computing from alchemy to science.


That is what I love about sconce most of the time it raises more questions than it answers . :D


Always bemusing and a bit amusing to read a discussion in the comments section between posters who have no understanding
of what they are discussing.

Having said that, quantum computing is a field that I've almost completely ignored.

What I do know that the biggest challenge to building a working quantum computer is decoherence as discussed above.

Two resource sites for anyone interested in learning more:

http://www.theory.caltech.edu/~preskill ... ph219_2017

http://inst.eecs.berkeley.edu/~cs191/fa14/


I think that the point of the first highlighted poster comment is that the headline promised an explanation and the article in no way delivered one. Remember "Buzz words"? I always looked at them at a good way for people that do not understand a subject to try to look like they do.
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Typhoon » Mon Oct 16, 2017 4:59 am

You are probably correct.

Being incorrigibly lazy, I quickly scanned the quotes.

To understand quantum computing one should have a working knowledge of QM.
Well, to understand it at any meaningful level.

I have not payed much attention to the field as the gap between what is predicted by theory and what has actually been built to date is rather large.
There is always the possibility of a major breakthrough, but decoherence is a challenging obstacle.

You can take a 16 qubit processor at the IBM Quantum Experience (QX) for a spin*.

*pun intended
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Typhoon » Mon Oct 16, 2017 3:20 pm

Forbes - Spiegel | Merging Neutron Stars Seen With Both Gravitational Waves And Light

Science | Merging neutron stars generate gravitational waves and a celestial light show

Four times in the past two years, physicists working with mammoth gravitational wave detectors have sensed something go bump in the night, sending invisible ripples through spacetime. Today, they announced the detection of a fifth such disturbance—but this time astronomers saw it too, at every wavelength of light from gamma radiation to radio waves. Just as physicists had predicted, the unprecedented view of the cosmic cataclysm—in which two super-dense neutron stars spiraled into each other—brought with it a cornucopia of insights, each of which by itself would count as a major scientific advance.
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Typhoon » Sat Oct 28, 2017 3:27 am

Science Mag | New test of electron’s roundness could help explain universe’s matter/antimatter imbalance

When it comes to measuring how round the electron is, physicists hate uncertainty. Much depends on the most precise measurement possible, including a potential answer to a major scientific puzzle: why the universe contains any matter at all.

In a series of ever-more-sensitive experiments over the past 30 years, researchers have established that if the shape of the electron has any distortion at all, the bulge must be smaller than 1 thousand trillion trillionths of a millimeter (10-27 mm). Now, a group at the JILA research institute in Boulder, Colorado, has demonstrated what it describes as a "radically different" approach that probes electrons inside larger charged particles. Ed Hinds of Imperial College London calls the approach "brilliant" for the field, because it promises to help reduce the uncertainty still further—and perhaps reveal an actual distortion.
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Simple Minded » Sun Oct 29, 2017 12:29 am

Typhoon wrote:Science Mag | New test of electron’s roundness could help explain universe’s matter/antimatter imbalance

When it comes to measuring how round the electron is, physicists hate uncertainty. Much depends on the most precise measurement possible, including a potential answer to a major scientific puzzle: why the universe contains any matter at all.

In a series of ever-more-sensitive experiments over the past 30 years, researchers have established that if the shape of the electron has any distortion at all, the bulge must be smaller than 1 thousand trillion trillionths of a millimeter (10-27 mm). Now, a group at the JILA research institute in Boulder, Colorado, has demonstrated what it describes as a "radically different" approach that probes electrons inside larger charged particles. Ed Hinds of Imperial College London calls the approach "brilliant" for the field, because it promises to help reduce the uncertainty still further—and perhaps reveal an actual distortion.


Any mention of the error margin of this "measurement?"

Obviously, there must be a tolerance on the length of the millimeter used in comparison. Africa millimeter or European millimeter?

Is this minute dimension measured on an electron that is at room temperature? Was the thermometer calibrated?

While I appreciate the efforts of those on the cutting edge, doing work I could never do, I always find it interesting when cutting edge science gets either magical or religious.
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Typhoon » Sun Oct 29, 2017 1:18 am

Simple Minded wrote:
Typhoon wrote:Science Mag | New test of electron’s roundness could help explain universe’s matter/antimatter imbalance

When it comes to measuring how round the electron is, physicists hate uncertainty. Much depends on the most precise measurement possible, including a potential answer to a major scientific puzzle: why the universe contains any matter at all.

In a series of ever-more-sensitive experiments over the past 30 years, researchers have established that if the shape of the electron has any distortion at all, the bulge must be smaller than 1 thousand trillion trillionths of a millimeter (10-27 mm). Now, a group at the JILA research institute in Boulder, Colorado, has demonstrated what it describes as a "radically different" approach that probes electrons inside larger charged particles. Ed Hinds of Imperial College London calls the approach "brilliant" for the field, because it promises to help reduce the uncertainty still further—and perhaps reveal an actual distortion.


Any mention of the error margin of this "measurement?"

Obviously, there must be a tolerance on the length of the millimeter used in comparison. Africa millimeter or European millimeter?

Is this minute dimension measured on an electron that is at room temperature? Was the thermometer calibrated?

While I appreciate the efforts of those on the cutting edge, doing work I could never do, I always find it interesting when cutting edge science gets either magical or religious.


The experimental uncertainties, statistical + systematic, are summarized in the Wikiped section below.

Experimental Measurements of the Electron EDM

For the cognoscenti, The Particle Data Group 2017 ] Electron Dipole Moment [PDF] and references therein.

As these are controlled experiments, rather than observations [such as global temperature deviations], they are repeatable and reproducible.
Most of the analysis effort goes into understanding any and all possible sources of systematic error.
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Simple Minded » Sun Oct 29, 2017 2:45 pm

Typhoon wrote:
Simple Minded wrote:
Typhoon wrote:Science Mag | New test of electron’s roundness could help explain universe’s matter/antimatter imbalance

When it comes to measuring how round the electron is, physicists hate uncertainty. Much depends on the most precise measurement possible, including a potential answer to a major scientific puzzle: why the universe contains any matter at all.

In a series of ever-more-sensitive experiments over the past 30 years, researchers have established that if the shape of the electron has any distortion at all, the bulge must be smaller than 1 thousand trillion trillionths of a millimeter (10-27 mm). Now, a group at the JILA research institute in Boulder, Colorado, has demonstrated what it describes as a "radically different" approach that probes electrons inside larger charged particles. Ed Hinds of Imperial College London calls the approach "brilliant" for the field, because it promises to help reduce the uncertainty still further—and perhaps reveal an actual distortion.


Any mention of the error margin of this "measurement?"

Obviously, there must be a tolerance on the length of the millimeter used in comparison. Africa millimeter or European millimeter?

Is this minute dimension measured on an electron that is at room temperature? Was the thermometer calibrated?

While I appreciate the efforts of those on the cutting edge, doing work I could never do, I always find it interesting when cutting edge science gets either magical or religious.


The experimental uncertainties, statistical + systematic, are summarized in the Wikiped section below.

Experimental Measurements of the Electron EDM

For the cognoscenti, The Particle Data Group 2017 ] Electron Dipole Moment [PDF] and references therein.

As these are controlled experiments, rather than observations [such as global temperature deviations], they are repeatable and reproducible.
Most of the analysis effort goes into understanding any and all possible sources of systematic error.


That's the fascinating part, IMSMO, for the non-cognoscenti, it sounds like two priests arguing over whether 400 or 500 angels can dance on the head of a pin. Fat angels or skinny angels? Catholic or Protestant priests?

I'm glad there are people who can spend decades engaged in fields of study that are inches wide and miles deep, because one can never imagine the future value of such a knowledge base. But for those of us who are a couple feet wide and 18" deep....... it is like listening to Coast2CoastAM. Fun stuff, but not as important as keeping the lights on or automobile brakes from failing.
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Typhoon » Sun Oct 29, 2017 4:01 pm

Simple Minded wrote:
Typhoon wrote:
Simple Minded wrote:
Typhoon wrote:Science Mag | New test of electron’s roundness could help explain universe’s matter/antimatter imbalance

When it comes to measuring how round the electron is, physicists hate uncertainty. Much depends on the most precise measurement possible, including a potential answer to a major scientific puzzle: why the universe contains any matter at all.

In a series of ever-more-sensitive experiments over the past 30 years, researchers have established that if the shape of the electron has any distortion at all, the bulge must be smaller than 1 thousand trillion trillionths of a millimeter (10-27 mm). Now, a group at the JILA research institute in Boulder, Colorado, has demonstrated what it describes as a "radically different" approach that probes electrons inside larger charged particles. Ed Hinds of Imperial College London calls the approach "brilliant" for the field, because it promises to help reduce the uncertainty still further—and perhaps reveal an actual distortion.


Any mention of the error margin of this "measurement?"

Obviously, there must be a tolerance on the length of the millimeter used in comparison. Africa millimeter or European millimeter?

Is this minute dimension measured on an electron that is at room temperature? Was the thermometer calibrated?

While I appreciate the efforts of those on the cutting edge, doing work I could never do, I always find it interesting when cutting edge science gets either magical or religious.


The experimental uncertainties, statistical + systematic, are summarized in the Wikiped section below.

Experimental Measurements of the Electron EDM

For the cognoscenti, The Particle Data Group 2017 ] Electron Dipole Moment [PDF] and references therein.

As these are controlled experiments, rather than observations [such as global temperature deviations], they are repeatable and reproducible.
Most of the analysis effort goes into understanding any and all possible sources of systematic error.


That's the fascinating part, IMSMO, for the non-cognoscenti, it sounds like two priests arguing over whether 400 or 500 angels can dance on the head of a pin. Fat angels or skinny angels? Catholic or Protestant priests?

I'm glad there are people who can spend decades engaged in fields of study that are inches wide and miles deep, because one can never imagine the future value of such a knowledge base. But for those of us who are a couple feet wide and 18" deep....... it is like listening to Coast2CoastAM. Fun stuff, but not as important as keeping the lights on or automobile brakes from failing.


In the 19th century, many would have argued that keeping one's horse healthy and well shod was far more important than Faraday's toy experiments and Maxwell's theories. Yet electromagnetism is today one of the foundations of our industrial civilization.

The same could have been said about the obscure early 20th puzzles regarding atomic spectra and black body radiation. The explanation, quantum mechanics, is now part of our everyday lives: transistors, lasers, LEDs, and, if necessary, MRIs. Another foundation of our industrial civilization.

Also in the early 20th, pondering the nature of space, time, and mass lead to general relativity, a theory which also seems at first completely removed from daily life, yet is required to operate the global positioning system - the GPS, which has become an essential part of air and sea navigation along with personal use and much anticipated autonomous vehicles.

Asking the modern version of "how many angels can fit on the head of a pin?", "how many transistors can fit on the head of a pin?', lead to VLSI and multibillion transistor CPUs and GPUs.

Thanks to EM and QM you can listen to Coast2CoastAM streaming over the internet.

Science is the spanner in the works of men and women who see them as sensible, sound, and practical minded or, less charitably, lacking in imagination and the ability to think long term*. Given that science is unpredictable, discoveries are driven by curiosity, and are often serendipitous. it is also the bane of contemporary management theory and methods. I don't know if the measurements above will find some practical applications, but am confident that the techniques developed to perform them will.

*When William Gladstone, then British Chancellor of the Exchequer (Minister of Finance) later PM, asked Faraday, after one of his demonstrations, of the practical value of electricity (1850), apocrypha has it that Faraday replied,
"Why, Sir, there is every probability that you will soon be able to tax it."

Before the LHC at CERN, the most powerful particle accelerator on the planet was the Tevatron at Fermilab, located in the far west suburbs of Chicago [Batavia, IL]. During US Congress hearings on its construction, a member of Congress asked the Director, Robert Wilson, if building the Tevatron would contribute to national security. This was during the height of the Cold War. Rather than providing historical justifications, as I've done above, Wilson was far more direct, "No, but it one of the things that makes the US worth defending." Of course, he was not referring to the Tevatron itself, but to the culture and civilization willing to undertake such a project.
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Simple Minded » Sun Oct 29, 2017 5:25 pm

Typhoon wrote:
In the 19th century, many would have argued that keeping one's horse healthy and well shod was far more important than Faraday's toy experiments and Maxwell's theories. Yet electromagnetism is today one of the foundations of our industrial civilization.

The same could have been said about the obscure early 20th puzzles regarding atomic spectra and black body radiation. The explanation, quantum mechanics, is now part of our everyday lives: transistors, lasers, LEDs, and, if necessary, MRIs. Another foundation of our industrial civilization.

Also in the early 20th, pondering the nature of space, time, and mass lead to general relativity, a theory which also seems at first completely removed from daily life, yet is required to operate the global positioning system - the GPS, which has become an essential part of air and sea navigation along with personal use and much anticipated autonomous vehicles.

Asking the modern version of "how many angels can fit on the head of a pin?", "how many transistors can fit on the head of a pin?', lead to VLSI and multibillion transistor CPUs and GPUs.

Thanks to EM and QM you can listen to Coast2CoastAM streaming over the internet.

Science is the spanner in the works of men and women who see them as sensible, sound, and practical minded or, less charitably, lacking in imagination and the ability to think long term*. Given that science is unpredictable, discoveries are driven by curiosity, and are often serendipitous. it is also the bane of contemporary management theory and methods. I don't know if the measurements above will find some practical applications, but am confident that the techniques developed to perform them will.

*When William Gladstone, then British Chancellor of the Exchequer (Minister of Finance) later PM, asked Faraday, after one of his demonstrations, of the practical value of electricity (1850), apocrypha has it that Faraday replied,
"Why, Sir, there is every probability that you will soon be able to tax it."

Before the LHC at CERN, the most powerful particle accelerator on the planet was the Tevatron at Fermilab, located in the far west suburbs of Chicago [Batavia, IL]. During US Congress hearings on its construction, a member of Congress asked the Director, Robert Wilson, if building the Tevatron would contribute to national security. This was during the height of the Cold War. Rather than providing historical justifications, as I've done above, Wilson was far more direct, "No, but it one of the things that makes the US worth defending." Of course, he was not referring to the Tevatron itself, but to the culture and civilization willing to undertake such a project.


Well said as always. Celebrate diversity!

As you have noted, paychecks influence belief systems, and expertise in one area does not transfer to other areas. Those who have never seen a Bigfoot, often believe they do not exist!

My personality tends to default towards "I need to see some serious production or tangible benefit in the next few hours, days, or weeks," or I get frustrated and my self-esteem suffers. :( "I want patience and I want it now! Dammit!"

You do the ground work which makes my future teleportation and contact with ET possible, and I'll keep the lights on in your lab and the brakes working in your car so you can drive thru the war zones of Chicago without fear. ;)

Deal?

Now, can you create a death ray we can use to purge "science" of those pesky "climate scientists?" They are destroying your brand and credibility! If not soon, let me know, we have plenty of old school weapons in stock..... maybe stockades or dunking chairs until they recant? :P
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Typhoon » Sun Oct 29, 2017 5:58 pm

Simple Minded wrote:
Typhoon wrote:
In the 19th century, many would have argued that keeping one's horse healthy and well shod was far more important than Faraday's toy experiments and Maxwell's theories. Yet electromagnetism is today one of the foundations of our industrial civilization.

The same could have been said about the obscure early 20th puzzles regarding atomic spectra and black body radiation. The explanation, quantum mechanics, is now part of our everyday lives: transistors, lasers, LEDs, and, if necessary, MRIs. Another foundation of our industrial civilization.

Also in the early 20th, pondering the nature of space, time, and mass lead to general relativity, a theory which also seems at first completely removed from daily life, yet is required to operate the global positioning system - the GPS, which has become an essential part of air and sea navigation along with personal use and much anticipated autonomous vehicles.

Asking the modern version of "how many angels can fit on the head of a pin?", "how many transistors can fit on the head of a pin?', lead to VLSI and multibillion transistor CPUs and GPUs.

Thanks to EM and QM you can listen to Coast2CoastAM streaming over the internet.

Science is the spanner in the works of men and women who see them as sensible, sound, and practical minded or, less charitably, lacking in imagination and the ability to think long term*. Given that science is unpredictable, discoveries are driven by curiosity, and are often serendipitous. it is also the bane of contemporary management theory and methods. I don't know if the measurements above will find some practical applications, but am confident that the techniques developed to perform them will.

*When William Gladstone, then British Chancellor of the Exchequer (Minister of Finance) later PM, asked Faraday, after one of his demonstrations, of the practical value of electricity (1850), apocrypha has it that Faraday replied,
"Why, Sir, there is every probability that you will soon be able to tax it."

Before the LHC at CERN, the most powerful particle accelerator on the planet was the Tevatron at Fermilab, located in the far west suburbs of Chicago [Batavia, IL]. During US Congress hearings on its construction, a member of Congress asked the Director, Robert Wilson, if building the Tevatron would contribute to national security. This was during the height of the Cold War. Rather than providing historical justifications, as I've done above, Wilson was far more direct, "No, but it one of the things that makes the US worth defending." Of course, he was not referring to the Tevatron itself, but to the culture and civilization willing to undertake such a project.


Well said as always. Celebrate diversity!

As you have noted, paychecks influence belief systems, and expertise in one area does not transfer to other areas. Those who have never seen a Bigfoot, often believe they do not exist!

My personality tends to default towards "I need to see some serious production or tangible benefit in the next few hours, days, or weeks," or I get frustrated and my self-esteem suffers. :( "I want patience and I want it now! Dammit!"

You do the ground work which makes my future teleportation and contact with ET possible, and I'll keep the lights on in your lab and the brakes working in your car so you can drive thru the war zones of Chicago without fear. ;)

Deal?


Sure. ;)

Unfortunately, this year will be the first in over a decade that I will not be making my annual post-Thanksgiving trip to Chicagoland
as the goals of my work have changed. Already missing it. Hope to return in a year or two.

Simple Minded wrote:Now, can you create a death ray we can use to purge "science" of those pesky "climate scientists?" They are destroying your brand and credibility! If not soon, let me know, we have plenty of old school weapons in stock..... maybe stockades or dunking chairs until they recant? :P


Science has grown rapidly due to its success over the last four centuries. As with any human activity, over time rot occurs in the form of opportunists and scoundrels. The unsupported over-the-top claims of some climate scientists are probably the worst example of junk science in the history of science, with eugenics coming a close second. Hopefully, this to will pass, although I suspect that the "Because science" crowd who treat science as a secular religion and scientists as pseudo-religious authority figures will simply move onto the next imminent, yet ever receding, apocalypse aided and abetted by a new generation of former B students.
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Simple Minded » Mon Oct 30, 2017 12:09 pm

Typhoon wrote:
Science has grown rapidly due to its success over the last four centuries. As with any human activity, over time rot occurs in the form of opportunists and scoundrels. The unsupported over-the-top claims of some climate scientists are probably the worst example of junk science in the history of science, with eugenics coming a close second. Hopefully, this to will pass, although I suspect that the "Because science" crowd who treat science as a secular religion and scientists as pseudo-religious authority figures will simply move onto the next imminent, yet ever receding, apocalypse aided and abetted by a new generation of former B students.


Yep. Never doubt the appeal and influence of free money and doomer porn. Already the global warming experts of today are denying the existence of the global cooling experts of the 1970's.

Science as an institution will survive simply because it works. The short term (human generation or two) ripples will be interesting to watch. They should be localized. Some denominations will suffer more than others. Pedophilia in the Catholic Church is a good analogy.

Unfortunately, due to political funding of both, Climate Change is being taught to grade schoolers as Gospel in US public schools. It will be sad to see so many bright kids in the US get steered down a mythical path. I know more than a few fathers who are engineers who are correcting the party line as it is taught to their children in real time.

But, hopefully by employing scientific discipline, they students themselves will self-correct in spite of what their professors teach them.

Thankfully, physics ain't feelings.
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Heracleum Persicum » Fri Nov 03, 2017 12:23 am

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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Typhoon » Mon Nov 06, 2017 4:34 pm

Quark-level analogue of nuclear fusion with doubly heavy baryons

Who knows, perhaps one day particles only created on earth in high energy particle accelerators will power fusion.

Although, we probably need to get the regular version going first ;)
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Doc » Tue Nov 07, 2017 4:55 pm

The classes and the races to weak to master the new conditions of life must give way {..} They must perish in the revolutionary holocaust --Karl Marx
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Typhoon » Mon Nov 13, 2017 4:25 am

Cosmos | Scientists invent the abacus

Beyond the tongue-in-cheek headline, this is a brilliant idea regarding non-von Neumann computing architectures.
All the world's a stage.
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

Postby Typhoon » Thu Nov 16, 2017 11:10 pm

AIP Physics | Relativity Survives Scrutiny, Again

Two independent studies show no evidence that a fundamental symmetry in relativity, known as Lorentz invariance, breaks down.
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