3D Printing and Copyright

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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby Doc » Tue Sep 23, 2014 12:02 am

Enki wrote:What do you know about the prices of commercial pick and place systems? I mean prices to manufacture circuits, not the prices of the machines.


It has been a while for me Tinker. But it varies greatly depending on what type of parts being used. Chip on board which is generally what you would find in a smart phone is usually $50,000 Non recurring Engineering costs then depending on how many boards you want to make From $1000 per each to a few dollars per each for many. For SMD a few dollars per each per thousand. Sometimes with NRE programming costs some to teach the machine where to place the parts. Also if it includes a bigger Ball Grid Array chip they should be xrayed for statistical quality control which can be up $50 each. For Through hole (Which given the tech I think you won't be interested) a few dollars per each per thousand. Making an ASIC chip runs about the same as chip on board with the exception that the $50,000 NRE is Non re-occurring for one itineration Then you have to pony up another $50 grand for NRE.

Then in each of the above cases you have to deal with fall out of circuits to at least some degree. Usually dealing with bad connections from the parts to the boards. Sometimes with the wrong parts being inserted or inserted the wrong way. And then sometimes defective parts. You also have to deal with static. The preferred way is anti-static tile that is properly grounded then anti-static floor wax applied regularly. The problem with static is that often the circuits work until the are power cycled say 100 times then the weaking caused by static shock causes them to fail. That is a pretty bad scenario from a manufacturing point of view as it is usually more expensive than the cost of buying the parts and assembling the circuits.

But understand this At least from what I have personally seen it is usually a rat eat rat business.
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby Heracleum Persicum » Fri Oct 03, 2014 7:03 am

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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby noddy » Sat Oct 04, 2014 9:17 am

Enki wrote:What do you know about the prices of commercial pick and place systems? I mean prices to manufacture circuits, not the prices of the machines.


we use an expensive local one but we do expensive bespoke gear, it runs to several hundred dollars per board.

do come back and say what you found, id be curious.
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby Doc » Sat Oct 04, 2014 4:36 pm

noddy wrote:
Enki wrote:What do you know about the prices of commercial pick and place systems? I mean prices to manufacture circuits, not the prices of the machines.


we use an expensive local one but we do expensive bespoke gear, it runs to several hundred dollars per board.

do come back and say what you found, id be curious.



How many parts per board?
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby Doc » Mon Oct 06, 2014 3:24 am

Solar powered 3d sand to glass sinter

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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby Typhoon » Fri Oct 10, 2014 4:39 pm

All the world's a stage.
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby Heracleum Persicum » Tue Nov 18, 2014 6:54 pm

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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby noddy » Fri Jan 02, 2015 2:46 pm

i had an unexptected windfall so blew it all on cnc machines before bills or other tedious things claimed it.

a 3d printer, a cnc router, a cnc small laser etcher and a small cnc bladed cutting machine, both the router and the laser etcher are generic open source kits with lots of options for tools beyond the one they come with

woohoo, now its time to dissapear into learning the software and writing software for them, their was something wrong about my shed being all handtools, robots suits me much more.
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby Nonc Hilaire » Fri Jan 02, 2015 8:58 pm

noddy wrote:i had an unexptected windfall so blew it all on cnc machines before bills or other tedious things claimed it.

a 3d printer, a cnc router, a cnc small laser etcher and a small cnc bladed cutting machine, both the router and the laser etcher are generic open source kits with lots of options for tools beyond the one they come with

woohoo, now its time to dissapear into learning the software and writing software for them, their was something wrong about my shed being all handtools, robots suits me much more.


I know the first three, but I never heard of a cnc bladed cutter. Put up a link, please.
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby noddy » Sat Jan 03, 2015 2:25 am

generically they are just a plotter with a razor blade on a swivel, some people call them blade draggers.

http://knkusa.com/shop/knk-zing-air/ is the one i got, for me this is the most boring machine of the 4 but i got it for the missus and her costume business, it does fabric,felt,leather,vinyl etc etc so means she can do fancy trims and emblems and the like quickly and easily.

i may use it to cut out balsa wood shapes from time to time, it can also etch and emboss sheets of brass which may be useful to me.
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby Nonc Hilaire » Sat Jan 03, 2015 3:57 am

I see. One step up from the old vinyl sign machines.
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby noddy » Sat Jan 03, 2015 5:33 am

Nonc Hilaire wrote:I see. One step up from the old vinyl sign machines.


yeh exactly - one of those with switchable heads and more force so it can do different things beyond paper and thin vinyl.
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby Nonc Hilaire » Sat Jan 03, 2015 2:07 pm

noddy wrote:
Nonc Hilaire wrote:I see. One step up from the old vinyl sign machines.


yeh exactly - one of those with switchable heads and more force so it can do different things beyond paper and thin vinyl.

Nice for cutting friskets for use in airbrushing, sandblasting stone and etching glass.
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby noddy » Sat Jan 03, 2015 3:23 pm

Nonc Hilaire wrote:
noddy wrote:
Nonc Hilaire wrote:I see. One step up from the old vinyl sign machines.


yeh exactly - one of those with switchable heads and more force so it can do different things beyond paper and thin vinyl.

Nice for cutting friskets for use in airbrushing, sandblasting stone and etching glass.


we are currently chasing up good local suppliers of material for stencil type tasks :)

lucky im a programmer, the damn toolchains on the other hacker kits i got is quite clumsy, i wouldnt recommend it to anyone that wasnt of the correct temperament,
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby Nonc Hilaire » Sun Jan 04, 2015 1:57 pm

Which cnc router did you get? Those often have an open source program that is supposed to be very good.

I have a Carvewright, but haven't had time to fool with it lately. Not very robust and slow, but cheap with a small footprint.
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby noddy » Mon Jan 05, 2015 1:20 am

i pre-ordered the shapeoko3 which is the latest revision of one of the most popular open units - the default config seems roughly simmilar to yours but being a open kit you can put beefier motors or longer spans on it, the previous one had an upgrade kit to 1m wide, which this one should do better because its about 4 times thicker on the alloy.

i dare say it will also be slow and clumsy, all the hobbiest ones are :) 1-2 grand machines just dont have the hot-knife-through-butter of the 10-20 grand pro machines, for some strange reason!
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby Doc » Sat Mar 07, 2015 3:37 am

World's first 3d printed animation
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby Typhoon » Tue Mar 17, 2015 3:28 pm

Chemical trick speeds up 3D printing

Solid objects can be printed from liquid resin in mere minutes.


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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby Doc » Tue Mar 17, 2015 11:54 pm

Typhoon wrote:Chemical trick speeds up 3D printing

Solid objects can be printed from liquid resin in mere minutes.






http://www.cnet.com/news/terminator-sty ... of-liquid/


Terminator-style 3D printing grows objects from a pool of liquid


Terminator-style 3D printing grows objects from a pool of liquid

Carbon3D shows off a fascinating liquid-resin process that bypasses the typical layering approach of 3D printing.

by Amanda Kooser


Carbon3D could change the way 3D printing works.

Video screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET


Let's talk about layers. Traditional 3D printing involves a machine stacking layers of material to create a 3D object. This takes time and leaves ripples showing where those layers were laid down. Now, imagine you could grow an object out of a pool of liquid, much like Robert Patrick emerging as the T-1000 from a puddle of liquid metal in "Terminator 2."

Startup Carbon3D stepped out of stealth mode this week to introduce a new way to 3D-print objects. The company's CLIP (Continuous Liquid Interface Production) technology uses a photosensitive resin that reacts to UV light and oxygen. This results in smooth 3D objects that appear to magically emerge from a pool of liquid as a machine draws them upwards.

Here's a more technical description:

"At the heart of the CLIP process is a special window that is transparent to light and permeable to oxygen, much like a contact lens. By controlling the oxygen flux through the window, CLIP creates a "dead zone" in the resin pool just tens of microns thick (about 2-3 diameters of a red blood cell) where photopolymerization cannot occur. As a series of cross-sectional images of a 3D model is played like a movie into the resin pool from underneath, the physical object emerges continuously from just above the dead zone."

Oxygen prevents the resin from curing, while UV light causes it to cure. By controlling those two variables in an exacting way, an object can be created from liquid.

Going layerless could be a big step forward for 3D printing. "Existing 3D printing, or additive manufacturing, technology is really just 2D printing, over and over again," Carbon3D says. Objects made with the CLIP process turn out more like injection-molded objects with smooth exteriors. The technology can also be used to create objects from elastomers, which has applications ranging from car parts to athletic shoes.

The company has some lofty aspirations for its new technique, which it claims is 25 to 100 times faster than traditional 3D printing, offers a wider choice for materials and delivers commercial-quality products.

Carbon3D was founded in 2013, but has been working under the radar at developing the technology. It has already raised $40 million in funding from investors, which include Sequoia Capital, a firm known for backing Jawbone, Dropbox and Cisco.

"If 3D printing hopes to break out of the prototyping niche it has been trapped in for decades, we need to find a disruptive technology that attacks the problem from a fresh perspective and addresses 3D printing's fundamental weaknesses," said Jim Goetz, Carbon3D board member and Sequoia partner.

A fascinating video demo of the CLIP process in action shows a geometric ball emerging from a red primordial ooze. It will be interesting to follow Carbon3D as it works towards commercializing the technology. The future of 3D printing may look a lot more like a liquid than a solid.
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby YMix » Mon Jul 13, 2015 6:11 am

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3D Printing: Facts & Forecasts

Although additive manufacturing won’t replace conventional production methods, it is expected to revolutionize many niche areas. Exponential growth is on the horizon.
Market Researchers Predict 300% Growth over the Next Decade

From the user’s point of view, the additive manufacturing (AM) market can be basically divided into two sectors: the market for plastic printers that are now also affordable for private consumers, and the market for professional devices that are used in industry to “print” with materials of all kinds, including ceramic and metal powders. Although analysts still consider the additive manufacturing market to be a niche sector, they nonetheless state that it had a volume of up to €2 billion in 2012. It took the sector 20 years to reach a market value of €1 billion. The second billion was attained only five years later, and analysts now believe that it could grow at least fourfold over the next ten years.
From Prototypes to Mass Production.

Until recently, additive manufacturing was mainly used for rapid prototyping. Prototypes are produced layer by layer in the aerospace, automotive, and machine tool production industries, as well as in the medical and dental technology sectors. According to studies conducted by the Fraunhofer Additive Manufacturing Alliance, approximately 150 companies currently operate in this services market.

Even though analysts at Wohlers Associates expect the rapid prototyping market to grow from $1.5 billion in 2012 to more than $5 billion by 2020, they anticipate the most promising market to be in quite another area. “Money will be made with manufacturing, not with prototypes,” forecasts Tim Caffrey, a consultant at Wohlers. This assessment is shared by Bernhard Langefeld, a machine construction expert at Roland Berger Strategy Consultants and one of the authors of the study titled Additive Manufacturing – A Game Changer for the Industry? He thinks industry is already close to the large-scale production stage in the use of AM to create metallic structures for selected products in medicine and aviation. Additive manufacturing is already a reality for making artificial hip joints and crowns for teeth, for example. Using data obtained from scans, manufacturers create custom-fitted implants as unique items. In another sector, Siemens is now printing burner tips from powdered steel for use as replacement parts for gas turbines

...
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby YMix » Sun Jul 19, 2015 5:44 am

3D bone printing project in China to enter animal testing stage

[...]

This revolutionary project can be found in the biomedical building of the university’s huge campus, where a high-precision 3D printer is steadily manufacturing solid bone, one layer at a time, without metal components. So far remarkable successes have been achieved by 3D printing a combination of very fine bone powder and a biological glue, to form complete animal bones. As Huang said, they are now ready to start testing the structural differences between 3D printed bones and actual ones. ‘Optimistically, similar 3D printed bones can be clinically used within 5-6 years, though there is still a long way to go,’ said Huang.

This development is riding a wave of 3D printing innovation in Guangzhou. Last April, one patient in the nearby Zhujiang Hospital underwent surgery for a resection of his liver. Due to a complex spread of cancer of the liver, 60% of the organ had to be removed, though his life was possibly saved by Huang and his team. They developed a set of 3D printed models of the patient’s (a mr. Wu) liver, complete with veins, arteries and the cancer itself. Careful preparation with this 3D printed set enabled surgeons to complete the surgery while only removing 42.8% of the liver. Mr. Wu came back for a check up this week, and was doing well.

[...]

The 3D printing process of these materials themselves is a very precise matter. Miniscule layers of bone powder (around 0.1 mm) are 3D printed, followed by a layer of bio glue, followed by more powder, and again by glue. And so on. While it depends on what bone you’re 3D printing, this will require thousands of layers to form a very detailed structure.

While testing has so far been quite successful, print sizes cannot yet exceed 15 cm so far. ‘At the present in our goat and rabbit bone experiments, we have made some interesting progress and achieved results, but the main problem still exists. This is the matter of bio-compatibility – it’s not this rabbit's own bone powder after all – as the rejection phenomenon still exists. There are also some biomechanical issues, as the 3D printed bones are certainly not as strong as the original bones.’ The team leader explained. This is also one reason why 15 cm has been set as the limit, as longer structures lose sturdiness.

[...]
“There are a lot of killers. We’ve got a lot of killers. What, do you think our country’s so innocent? Take a look at what we’ve done, too.” - Donald J. Trump, President of the USA
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby YMix » Sun Jul 19, 2015 5:54 am

Raytheon now able to 3D print nearly every component of guided missile system

As the aerospace industry continues to explore applications for additive manufacturing ranging from components within airplane engines to even seat belt buckles, it’s not surprising that the developments have found their way into other types of products, too - such as missiles.

Recently, researchers at Raytheon Missile Systems have stated that they have already created next-generation guided missiles that uses additive manufacturing to produce nearly every component within its assembly. Among other parts, these include rocket engines, body fins, parts for the guidance and control systems, and more.

The development of a fully 3D printed missile is part of a company-wide push to supplement or replace traditional manufacturing processes for their missile parts with additive manufacturing processes. While it would make sense for the company to use processes such as direct metal laser sintering to produce a body shell, the engineers are also looking into more advanced use cases including the production of electrical circuits, housings for the company's revolutionary gallium nitride transmitters and custom fin designs for guided artillery shells.

“You could potentially have these in the field,” said Raytheon engineer Jeremy Danforth, who is among those who have printed working rocket motors. “Machines making machines. The user could [print on demand]. That’s the vision.”

Among other factors, the lower costs of owning and maintaining high-end equipment and the ability to increasingly modify existing low-cost 3D printers were enough of a reason for the company’s researchers to look into the possibility of creating every component of a guided weapon using 3D printing including the circuitry. In addition to reducing the costs associated with traditional manufacturing, it also allows for the designers and engineers to design quickly and iteratively with the ability to have their new part in hand within hours rather than weeks or even months.

“3-D printing could someday streamline [all] manufacturing process,” explains Leah Hull, additive manufacturing manager for Raytheon.

“When we print something, we have fewer piece parts, so your supply chain becomes simpler. Your development cycles are shorter; you’re getting parts much faster.”

Of course, using 3D printing also allows for designers and engineers to experiment with new structures that otherwise wouldn’t be possible to manufacture using traditional processes.

“You can design internal features that might be impossible to machine,” said Raytheon engineer Travis Mayberry, who is researching future uses of additive manufacturing and 3-D printing. “We’re trying new designs for thermal improvements and lightweight structures, things we couldn’t achieve with any other manufacturing method.”

Unsurprisingly, one of the biggest challenges for the researchers has been in the development of creating printable complex electronic circuits and microwave components. Currently, engineers at the Raytheon University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Institute are looking into new ways of producing the sophisticated radars and guidance systems used in the company’s air and missile defense systems.

While circuits can already be printed using an inkjet method, Raytheon is hoping that their research will enable their researchers to print more complicated circuit structures in three dimensions rather than the commonly-used flat silicon chip. From here, they hope to be able to print the circuitry directly into the missiles themselves as a complete and integrated system.

Of course, while 3D printing a missile is one thing, being able to 3D print a missile while out in the field is an entirely different kind of challenge.

“Before a warfighter can print a missile in the field,” says Raytheon University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Institute Director Chris McCarroll, “you need quality, controlled processes to fabricate all the component materials: the metallic strongbacks, and the plastic connectors, the semiconductors for processors, and the energetics and propulsion systems. The hard part is then making the connections between these components, as an example, the integrated control circuit that receives the command to light the fuse. At some relatively near-term point you may have to place chips down and interconnect them with printing. Or, in the future, maybe you’ll just print them.”
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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby Heracleum Persicum » Thu Aug 13, 2015 2:14 pm

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Re: 3D Printing and Copyright

Postby Nonc Hilaire » Thu Aug 13, 2015 3:32 pm

Heracleum Persicum wrote:.


The Future of 3D Printing


.

She mentions repeatability as problem. That means quality control is an issue as well.
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3-D printers now at Sam's Club - $1,299

Postby Nonc Hilaire » Tue Sep 08, 2015 7:18 pm

Wal-Mart's US discount warehouse style store.

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