Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

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Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Typhoon » Sun Apr 01, 2012 10:34 pm

How Killing the Angry Bird Will Save American Entrepreneurship

From computers to office furniture used by cute digital startups like Pinterest or Oink or FoSchnizzle, – it’s all made possible by a superior breed of entrepreneurs and inventors. They toil away in relative obscurity, often in Asia, solving big, complex problems. They squeeze 64GB onto something a Ken doll might swallow. Or, they make un-killable batteries that let Kim Kardashian tweet deep into the night. They even make solar cells viable and water out of thin air.

In the US, a stunning surplus of VC cash and leisure time feeds this feeble form of innovation – where getting something to scroll from left instead of right can be considered a breakthrough. It’s not that the entrepreneurs themselves aren’t smart or impressive. The market simply doesn’t demand they try that hard. Why build a plant when someone will give you $300 million to collect email addresses for a daily deals site?

The risk is the same as what happened in the banking industry – easy money drives high salaries and diverts talent from productive industries to unproductive ones. There’s plenty of demand for top engineers and inventors to improve natural gas extraction or harness ocean water. Instead, that talent can be found gambling on fictitious investments or perfecting the trajectory of a dead digital pig. Multiply that by several thousand and you have:

A country completely disconnected from real world problems faced by the rest of the planet – like no drinking water.

Entrepreneurs missing out on a chance to make money solving tangible problems
The US falling farther behind and deeper in debt as its top talent clicks away inside a dimming, narrow, digital consumer bunghole.

I’m not saying there’s no room for entertainment or leisure-oriented innovation, but I am saying if we want to continue getting those Lenovo’s from China, they’re not going to accept our Tweets or Oinks as payment.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Typhoon » Mon Apr 02, 2012 5:21 pm

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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby noddy » Fri Aug 17, 2012 3:16 am

woot, the oil age might finally be over and it wont require us running out of oil.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/08/17 ... n_storage/

exploration of fuel cells’ potential has moved slowly as boffins try to figure out the larger problem of just how to build a supply chain around a substance rather more volatile than petroleum.

Enter the Australian team from the University of New South Wales, which has found that compound named sodium borohydride (that’s NaBH4 for all you chemists out there) can absorb lots of hydrogen and then release it under what the researchers describe as “mild pressure conditions” of four mega pascals (4 MPa). That’s rather less than the rating of most scuba diving cylinders and presents a less tricky challenge than storing the gas as .. well ... a gas.

Dr Kondo-Francois Aguey-Zinsou, lead author of a paper on the subject published in ACS Nano, told ABC News NaBH4 acts like a “sponge” for hydrogen, and can soak up so much of the stuff that a conventionally-sized fuel tank stuffed full of the compound would get close to the energy potential of the same volume of petroleum.

But the news isn’t all good: the NaBH4 needs to be nano-engineered and stored in a nickel shell. Even then it only releases some of the stored hydrogen at 50 degrees Celsius and it’s only once the mercury hits 350 that the hydrogen really starts to flow.

The Center for Functional Nanomaterials at UNSW’s School of Chemical Engineering, where the work was conducted, intends to keep tinkering with NaBH4 as it believes there is the potential for “ … major advancements in the design of effective hydrogen storage materials from pristine borohydrides.”



time to invest in new zealand/iceland.. places with lots of free geothermals for splitting water, they will be the next mad arabs :P
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Real inventions are made of metal, not binary code.

Postby Enki » Fri Aug 17, 2012 2:51 pm

Typhoon wrote:How Killing the Angry Bird Will Save American Entrepreneurshi

From computers to office furniture used by cute digital startups like Pinterest or Oink or FoSchnizzle, – it’s all made possible by a superior breed of entrepreneurs and inventors. They toil away in relative obscurity, often in Asia, solving big, complex problems. They squeeze 64GB onto something a Ken doll might swallow. Or, they make un-killable batteries that let Kim Kardashian tweet deep into the night. They even make solar cells viable and water out of thin air.

In the US, a stunning surplus of VC cash and leisure time feeds this feeble form of innovation – where getting something to scroll from left instead of right can be considered a breakthrough. It’s not that the entrepreneurs themselves aren’t smart or impressive. The market simply doesn’t demand they try that hard. Why build a plant when someone will give you $300 million to collect email addresses for a daily deals site?

The risk is the same as what happened in the banking industry – easy money drives high salaries and diverts talent from productive industries to unproductive ones. There’s plenty of demand for top engineers and inventors to improve natural gas extraction or harness ocean water. Instead, that talent can be found gambling on fictitious investments or perfecting the trajectory of a dead digital pig. Multiply that by several thousand and you have:

A country completely disconnected from real world problems faced by the rest of the planet – like no drinking water.

Entrepreneurs missing out on a chance to make money solving tangible problems
The US falling farther behind and deeper in debt as its top talent clicks away inside a dimming, narrow, digital consumer bunghole.

I’m not saying there’s no room for entertainment or leisure-oriented innovation, but I am saying if we want to continue getting those Lenovo’s from China, they’re not going to accept our Tweets or Oinks as payment.


I cannot believe we haven't stamped out this queer form of idiotic curmudgeonly luddism yet.

It's Spenglerian in its way:

1) List whole bunch of things author thinks are stupid.
2) Make fanciful claim about this impacting innovation negatively.

Anyone who thinks that Twitter is something frivolous and for entertainment by this time is simply a moron. It's an indefensible position to take. Video games have driven innovation in computing from day 1, and people like this imbecile have been writing this same article over and over since at least the late 80s. The app development market is an incredibly robust part of the economy and for every Angry birds there is an Embark. Since these sorts of apps literally did not exist before the iPhone came out roughly half a decade ago, the amount of innovation in that sphere is mind-bogglingly staggering. And if all someone can look at is that a video game is popular and extrapolate a whole bunch of nonsense from that universe of creativity, then we shouldn't take that person very seriously.

It's simply a twentieth century mindset. It's basically computer programming versus engineering. He laments that software developers are getting VC that he wishes was going to engineers. It's as simple as that. It's a straight up falsehood that innovation is not occurring in other sectors. It's a straight up falsehood that innovation in America is on any sort of downward trajectory at all.

Ranting about Angry Birds is like ranting about how much money gets spent on Skittles. Yes, people have always spent a portion of their money on frivolous bullshit. But that frivolous bullshit employs people, and those people earn wages and spend their money on other stuff.

God I hate this guy. It's the tech-wonk version of Spengler. Soppy sentimental bullshit that bears no relationship to reality.
Last edited by Enki on Fri Aug 17, 2012 2:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Enki » Fri Aug 17, 2012 2:55 pm

For my part, I am working on a startup that is looking at all the poorly organized raw data being thrown at us by public agencies and trying put that data into rationalized and useful forms.

RIght now we're working with MTA (NYC's subway system) and Energy Production data.

It won't be inventing a new 'insert mechanical invention fap here', but I think it's a niche that we can do pretty well from.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Azrael » Sat Aug 18, 2012 1:10 am


I'm a bit worried about security issues with this. Chinese networking gear is already known to have backdoors for Chicom espionage.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Azrael » Sat Aug 18, 2012 1:12 am

noddy wrote:woot, the oil age might finally be over and it wont require us running out of oil.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/08/17 ... n_storage/

exploration of fuel cells’ potential has moved slowly as boffins try to figure out the larger problem of just how to build a supply chain around a substance rather more volatile than petroleum.

Enter the Australian team from the University of New South Wales, which has found that compound named sodium borohydride (that’s NaBH4 for all you chemists out there) can absorb lots of hydrogen and then release it under what the researchers describe as “mild pressure conditions” of four mega pascals (4 MPa). That’s rather less than the rating of most scuba diving cylinders and presents a less tricky challenge than storing the gas as .. well ... a gas.

Dr Kondo-Francois Aguey-Zinsou, lead author of a paper on the subject published in ACS Nano, told ABC News NaBH4 acts like a “sponge” for hydrogen, and can soak up so much of the stuff that a conventionally-sized fuel tank stuffed full of the compound would get close to the energy potential of the same volume of petroleum.

But the news isn’t all good: the NaBH4 needs to be nano-engineered and stored in a nickel shell. Even then it only releases some of the stored hydrogen at 50 degrees Celsius and it’s only once the mercury hits 350 that the hydrogen really starts to flow.

The Center for Functional Nanomaterials at UNSW’s School of Chemical Engineering, where the work was conducted, intends to keep tinkering with NaBH4 as it believes there is the potential for “ … major advancements in the design of effective hydrogen storage materials from pristine borohydrides.”



time to invest in new zealand/iceland.. places with lots of free geothermals for splitting water, they will be the next mad arabs :P

Time to invest in Saudi Arabia -- they're going to be the Saudi Arabia of solar power.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby noddy » Thu Aug 23, 2012 5:01 am

http://www.photonics.com/Article.aspx?AID=51683

Researchers at the FOM Institute AMOLF in Amsterdam, King’s College London and the Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO) in Barcelona broke Ernst Abbe’s specification for the resolution limit of a diffraction-limited microscope using a technique called angle-dependent cathodoluminescence imaging spectroscopy.

Natural photonic crystals — nanostructures composed of two materials with a different refractive index arranged in a regular pattern with exotic optical properties — are what create the iridescent colors found in certain species of butterflies, birds, beetles and opal gemstones.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Typhoon » Thu Aug 30, 2012 7:19 pm

noddy wrote:woot, the oil age might finally be over and it wont require us running out of oil.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/08/17 ... n_storage/

exploration of fuel cells’ potential has moved slowly as boffins try to figure out the larger problem of just how to build a supply chain around a substance rather more volatile than petroleum.

Enter the Australian team from the University of New South Wales, which has found that compound named sodium borohydride (that’s NaBH4 for all you chemists out there) can absorb lots of hydrogen and then release it under what the researchers describe as “mild pressure conditions” of four mega pascals (4 MPa). That’s rather less than the rating of most scuba diving cylinders and presents a less tricky challenge than storing the gas as .. well ... a gas.

Dr Kondo-Francois Aguey-Zinsou, lead author of a paper on the subject published in ACS Nano, told ABC News NaBH4 acts like a “sponge” for hydrogen, and can soak up so much of the stuff that a conventionally-sized fuel tank stuffed full of the compound would get close to the energy potential of the same volume of petroleum.

But the news isn’t all good: the NaBH4 needs to be nano-engineered and stored in a nickel shell. Even then it only releases some of the stored hydrogen at 50 degrees Celsius and it’s only once the mercury hits 350 that the hydrogen really starts to flow.

The Center for Functional Nanomaterials at UNSW’s School of Chemical Engineering, where the work was conducted, intends to keep tinkering with NaBH4 as it believes there is the potential for “ … major advancements in the design of effective hydrogen storage materials from pristine borohydrides.”


time to invest in new zealand/iceland.. places with lots of free geothermals for splitting water, they will be the next mad arabs :P


Sodium borohydride's cousin, lithium borohydride, is "off the charts" in terms of energy density.

Image

In principle very appealing - the problem is that the process is difficult to reverse.

I hope that the R&D continues, but I won't be holding my breath :wink:
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Typhoon » Thu Aug 30, 2012 7:20 pm

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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby noddy » Fri Aug 31, 2012 2:41 am

Typhoon wrote:In principle very appealing - the problem is that the process is difficult to reverse.

I hope that the R&D continues, but I won't be holding my breath :wink:


:-) i may have been a tad overblow in my rhetoric, however its all step by step and this is the next step.

hydrogen fuel cells is the only tech im aware of that is a proper replacement for petrol and places with lots of sunlight or lots of geothermals will be sitting pretty.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Typhoon » Fri Aug 31, 2012 7:46 pm

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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Milo » Sat Sep 01, 2012 12:52 am

Moore's Law keeps going, with no end in sight. This alone can turn us all into Homeric Gods within a decade.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Skin Job » Sat Sep 01, 2012 2:37 am

The only way transistor counts are doubling these days is by adding more cores; this won't be productive indefinitely, partly due to limitations in the efficiency of parallel computing, and partly due to the laws of physics, which Moore's Law, unfortunately, cannot trump. It may take breakthroughs in quantum computing to provide the godlike powers you envision.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Enki » Sat Sep 01, 2012 2:58 am

You can have godlike powers at current hardware levels. All the real innovation is in software. People who claim that innovation is being stifled are usually biased toward engineering and completely discount simple and elegant innovations like twitter. I am setting up a social media presence for my company that wil with one submission broadcast on two dozen networks. Simple innovations allow me to build a robust network presence for a small business. When SEO is properly tuned we will be at the top page of Google for all of our specialties. This will help us get business.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Typhoon » Sat Sep 01, 2012 7:04 am

Skin Job wrote:The only way transistor counts are doubling these days is by adding more cores; this won't be productive indefinitely, partly due to limitations in the efficiency of parallel computing, and partly due to the laws of physics, which Moore's Law, unfortunately, cannot trump. It may take breakthroughs in quantum computing to provide the godlike powers you envision.


The material of the moment in condensed matter physics is graphene.

In part due to it's high carrier [electron] mobility with potential applications to ultrafast transistors.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Skin Job » Sat Sep 01, 2012 7:08 pm

Enki wrote:You can have godlike powers at current hardware levels. All the real innovation is in software. People who claim that innovation is being stifled are usually biased toward engineering and completely discount simple and elegant innovations like twitter. I am setting up a social media presence for my company that wil with one submission broadcast on two dozen networks. Simple innovations allow me to build a robust network presence for a small business. When SEO is properly tuned we will be at the top page of Google for all of our specialties. This will help us get business.


Twitter could have never existed but for scientists and engineers feeling stifled by their historical hardware capabilities. It's a mistake to discount the importance of either hardware or software innovation. One does not exist without the other.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Enki » Sun Sep 02, 2012 1:49 am

Skin Job wrote:
Enki wrote:You can have godlike powers at current hardware levels. All the real innovation is in software. People who claim that innovation is being stifled are usually biased toward engineering and completely discount simple and elegant innovations like twitter. I am setting up a social media presence for my company that wil with one submission broadcast on two dozen networks. Simple innovations allow me to build a robust network presence for a small business. When SEO is properly tuned we will be at the top page of Google for all of our specialties. This will help us get business.


Twitter could have never existed but for scientists and engineers feeling stifled by their historical hardware capabilities. It's a mistake to discount the importance of either hardware or software innovation. One does not exist without the other.


Who discounted hardware innovation?

I am merely pointing out that there is an inherent bias amongst the sort of tech doom and gloomers who talk about the dearth of innovation in America as they usually dismiss the small software innovations that occur every day. If it's not a new material, or a new type of physical machine they discount it.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Skin Job » Sun Sep 02, 2012 2:04 am

Is that so? I don't gravitate toward doom and gloom generally, and so was unaware of that sort of bias.

Right now software is still trying to catch up with existing hardware in the use of ever more processor cores in consumer level machines. There is an eight-core machine on my work desktop using five year old technology that is impossible to overtax with an average power user software suite. I'd love to see a game that could utilize all eight cores, no telling what that should make possible.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Enki » Sun Sep 02, 2012 2:35 am

Skin Job wrote:Is that so? I don't gravitate toward doom and gloom generally, and so was unaware of that sort of bias.

Right now software is still trying to catch up with existing hardware in the use of ever more processor cores in consumer level machines. There is an eight-core machine on my work desktop using five year old technology that is impossible to overtax with an average power user software suite. I'd love to see a game that could utilize all eight cores, no telling what that should make possible.


That would be cool. I have a lot of ideas for gaming engines that I don't think would be possible at current tech levels. Like I have an idea for a narrative/social game engine that would be similar in complexity to the modeling and physics engine of your average shooter. Basically as I see it, the future of gaming is destructible terrain and every single NPC being a discreet individual.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Skin Job » Sun Sep 02, 2012 2:43 am

I think there is much to be accomplished in the realm of AI for NPCs.

For any who might not want to take the time to find out, "NPC" = Non-player characters which are controlled by the game software and not by another player.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Milo » Tue Sep 04, 2012 9:34 pm

Typhoon wrote:
Skin Job wrote:The only way transistor counts are doubling these days is by adding more cores; this won't be productive indefinitely, partly due to limitations in the efficiency of parallel computing, and partly due to the laws of physics, which Moore's Law, unfortunately, cannot trump. It may take breakthroughs in quantum computing to provide the godlike powers you envision.


The material of the moment in condensed matter physics is graphene.

In part due to it's high carrier [electron] mobility with potential applications to ultrafast transistors.


I've been hearing 'law of physics' arguments for 3 decades. Remember when more than 33 mhz would be impossible due to RF interference with the other components? Yet most hardware has exceeded ML for that entire period, without slackening, let alone falling behind.

Oh I know: this time it's a barrier that cannot be gotten around and everything will come to a halt because of it. That's what they said all the other times too.

And it's not just CPU's it's storage and transmission too.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Skin Job » Wed Sep 05, 2012 12:12 am

Milo wrote:
Typhoon wrote:
Skin Job wrote:The only way transistor counts are doubling these days is by adding more cores; this won't be productive indefinitely, partly due to limitations in the efficiency of parallel computing, and partly due to the laws of physics, which Moore's Law, unfortunately, cannot trump. It may take breakthroughs in quantum computing to provide the godlike powers you envision.


The material of the moment in condensed matter physics is graphene.

In part due to it's high carrier [electron] mobility with potential applications to ultrafast transistors.


I've been hearing 'law of physics' arguments for 3 decades. Remember when more than 33 mhz would be impossible due to RF interference with the other components? Yet most hardware has exceeded ML for that entire period, without slackening, let alone falling behind.

Oh I know: this time it's a barrier that cannot be gotten around and everything will come to a halt because of it. That's what they said all the other times too.

And it's not just CPU's it's storage and transmission too.


I want you to be right, but they news on the ground is that CPUs are not much faster on a per core basis than they were several years ago, due to frequency scaling issues. Clock speeds actually fell pretty dramatically for a while at the release of Intel's Core technology even while performance increased, Intel's admission that clock speed was not going to progress indefinitely and another approach was needed. Today, adding ever more CPU cores has been the solution to keep up with Moore's Paradigm, but software engineers are having limited success at rewriting applications for parallel processing. It's all good if they can keep up with the breakneck pace that has prevailed so far, but it's my opinion that we've seen, and will continue to see some leveling off.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Azrael » Wed Sep 05, 2012 7:38 pm

Has there been much progress with improving software lockout mitigation in recent years?

(Edit: Perhaps this?)

That would seem to be a major issue with increasing performance by adding more CPU cores.
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Re: Research and Development; Invention and Innovation

Postby Typhoon » Sun Sep 30, 2012 9:42 pm

Former US Register of Copyright: New Technology Should Be Presumed Illegal Until US Congress Says Otherwise

Whenever possible, when the law is ambiguous or silent on the issue at bar, the courts should let those who want to market new technologies carry the burden of persuasion that a new exception to the broad rights enacted by Congress should be established. That is especially so if that technology poses grave dangers to the exclusive rights that Congress has given copyright owners. Commercial exploiters of new technologies should be required to convince Congress to sanction a new delivery system and/or exempt it from copyright liability. That is what Congress intended.
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