Gastronomy

A little song, a little dance, a little seltzer down your pants.

Gastronomy

Postby Azrael » Sun Jan 08, 2012 2:10 am

This thread is devoted to Gastronomy: food, restaurant recommendations, recipes, game for human consumption, etc.
cultivate a white rose
User avatar
Azrael
 
Posts: 1925
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2011 8:57 pm

The best way to prep salmon . . .

Postby Marcus » Sun Jan 08, 2012 4:11 pm

Salmon is usually cooked as a fillet or as a steak, both are problematic, and there is a much better way. Cooked as a fillet with its thin belly section and thick shoulder section, there is no way to cook the fillet evenly. Cooked as a steak, one is plagued by pieces of pin bones.

Here's how to do it right: First, remove the pin bones.

Then trim off the head end of the fillet perpendicular to its length (cook separately). Then come down the length of the fillet twice the thickness of the desired steaks—2" is my choice—and cut down through the skin. Proceed thus down the length of the fillet until you reach the uniformly thick tail section, which may be cooked as is.

Now take each 2" (or whatever) piece and cut down to but not through the skin. Fold the piece skin-to-skin for a perfectly boneless, uniformly thick piece of salmon. Below is what you'll end up with and your guests will thank you.

sockeye-salmon.jpg
sockeye-salmon.jpg (47.41 KiB) Viewed 1877 times
"The jawbone of an ass is just as dangerous a weapon today as in Sampson's time."
--- Richard Nixon
******************
"I consider looseness with words no less of a defect than looseness of the bowels."
—John Calvin
User avatar
Marcus
 
Posts: 2409
Joined: Tue Dec 27, 2011 2:23 pm
Location: Alaska

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Demon of Undoing » Thu Jan 26, 2012 8:00 pm

I remember the guys on the dock at Port Aransas, where a wide variety of fish would be brought in from chartered trips. Those guys wore the maile glove and worked a filet knife with unnatural speed and precision. The anatomy of each fish can vary in the particulars, as you show with salmon, and these guys knew them all. I never saw the equal with live blade work until I watched Mexicans work in a sheep slaughterhouse in San Angelo. There, it was more dramatic because of the size of the work, but it wasn't any more deft. I learned quite something from them both.

Pigs, though, oof. That's a chore.

More food prep than gastronomy; still, that plate gotta start somewhere.
Demon of Undoing
 
Posts: 1764
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 8:14 pm

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Nonc Hilaire » Thu Jan 26, 2012 11:30 pm

Sheep abattoirs are the worst. They cry like babies.
“Christ has no body now but yours. Yours are the eyes through which he looks with compassion on this world. Yours are the feet with which he walks among His people to do good. Yours are the hands through which he blesses His creation.”

Teresa of Ávila
User avatar
Nonc Hilaire
 
Posts: 4071
Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2011 1:28 am

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Demon of Undoing » Fri Jan 27, 2012 1:06 am

Nonc Hilaire wrote:Sheep abattoirs are the worst. They cry like babies.



It was not the most happy place. It takes a psychological toll on the workers. The hygiene of the place was much better than expected. Other than that, the animals were essentially crushed in their thoracic region via a series of decreasing diameter rollers, then throat cut and hung up, almost always dead by that time. One wasn't, and a Mexican worker with a thousand yard stare told me I was very strong to be able to lift the sheep back up on the hook like I did. Regardless of how complimentary he was being, I felt like it was an indictment.
Demon of Undoing
 
Posts: 1764
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 8:14 pm

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Nonc Hilaire » Fri Jan 27, 2012 1:42 am

Image
“Christ has no body now but yours. Yours are the eyes through which he looks with compassion on this world. Yours are the feet with which he walks among His people to do good. Yours are the hands through which he blesses His creation.”

Teresa of Ávila
User avatar
Nonc Hilaire
 
Posts: 4071
Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2011 1:28 am

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Marcus » Fri Jan 27, 2012 4:20 am

Nonc Hilaire wrote:Sheep abattoirs are the worst. They cry like babies.


That's what .22 long rifle shells are for.

Here's one from about 40 years ago when we used to raise and butcher a couple hogs every year. The guy holding the head was a friend, the kid is our son . . taken in Michigan's upper peninsula on our 30-acre place in the woods:
Attachments
ken001.jpg
ken001.jpg (29.25 KiB) Viewed 1842 times
"The jawbone of an ass is just as dangerous a weapon today as in Sampson's time."
--- Richard Nixon
******************
"I consider looseness with words no less of a defect than looseness of the bowels."
—John Calvin
User avatar
Marcus
 
Posts: 2409
Joined: Tue Dec 27, 2011 2:23 pm
Location: Alaska

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Enki » Fri Jan 27, 2012 8:00 pm

http://www.notechmagazine.com/2012/01/s ... ridge.html

Storing food without a refrigerator.

Image
Men often oppose a thing merely because they have had no agency in planning it, or because it may have been planned by those whom they dislike.
-Alexander Hamilton
User avatar
Enki
 
Posts: 4962
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2011 6:04 pm

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Typhoon » Sun Jan 29, 2012 10:22 pm

Nonc Hilaire wrote:http://c1.tacdn.com/img2/langs/ja/press/tripgraphic/tg_021f.png


Very interesting. :wink: Thanks.
All the world's a stage.
User avatar
Typhoon
 
Posts: 15173
Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2011 6:42 pm

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Typhoon » Sun Jan 29, 2012 10:22 pm

All the world's a stage.
User avatar
Typhoon
 
Posts: 15173
Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2011 6:42 pm

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Antipatros » Wed Feb 01, 2012 8:09 pm

An old Beth Elon recipe from the Jerusalem Post:

Asparagus with Niçoise Vinaigrette

1 kg. asparagus
2 tbsp. red wine vinegar
2 tbsp. Dijon mustard
2/3 cup freshest olive oil
2 shallots, chopped
2 ripe tomatoes
1/3 cup pitted black olives
1 tbsp. capers, chopped

Steam or roast the asparagus, as desired, and lay on a dish with shallow sides.

In a small jar, put the vinegar and mustard. Close and shake well, until the mustard is dissolved. Add the oil, a good pinch of salt and shake again. Remove to a small bowl.

Pour some boiling water over the tomatoes, slip off the skins, remove the inner juice and seeds, and chop well. Add the tomatoes, the chopped shallots, olives and capers to the oil and whisk well. Taste for seasoning, and add a good grinding of pepper. Spoon the dressing over the asparagus and serve.
(Serves 6 as first course).
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
User avatar
Antipatros
 
Posts: 721
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:33 pm

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Antipatros » Wed Feb 01, 2012 8:23 pm

As Gordon Ramsay says, if you serve simple food, it must be amazing. It's a lesson the British Chippy, an unpretentious local fish and chips shop, has learnt well.

The 6-oz. handcut haddock fillet is served in a light, crisp batter, with the flesh juicy and delicious. In short, it is virtually perfect.

Even better are the fries. The chips are made from locally-grown organic potatoes (except when demand exhausts the supply, as happened last summer). I'm not sure of the variety, but the flavour is mid-way between Yukon Gold and Russian banana potatoes. They are exalted far above ordinary fast food fries.

The friendly, efficient service doesn't hurt either.

There is probably a small restaurant near you serving equally meritorious fare.
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
User avatar
Antipatros
 
Posts: 721
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:33 pm

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Antipatros » Fri Feb 03, 2012 3:40 pm

We can easily obtain bison at the supermarket or at the ranch (also elk and sometimes caribou). It may require more effort in other areas but should not be insuperably difficult.

Canadian Bison

Nutritional Value

Bison meat is a nutrient dense food because of the proportion of protein, fat, mineral, and fatty acids to its caloric value. Comparisons to other meat sources have shown that bison meat has a greater concentration of iron, zinc and essential fatty acids.

Bison meat is a rich source of complete protein containing all the essential amino acids in appropriate amounts. Each serving contains about 22 grams of protein which is then used in the body to build and repair tissues, produce enzymes and some hormones, and maintain cell membranes and components of the immune system.

Rich in Vitamin B12, Selenium, Zinc and Phosphorus, bison meat is also an excellent source of Iron, Vitamin B6 and Niacin, all of which are recommended daily.

Bison meat contains the “essential fatty acids”, linoleic (omega - 3) and linoleic (omega - 6) fatty acids. These substances are necessary for us to eat but can not be made in our bodies and are thus, commonly lacking. Their function is to assist the formation of cell membranes, aiding in the production of hormone-like compounds, and participating in immune and visual processes. Omega 3 fatty acids have been shown to help fend off Alzheimer’s disease and reduce the likelihood of heart attacks.

Bison meat is a great natural source of bio-available iron. The high iron content in bison meat helps boost energy and increase endurance by improving the blood’s capability to transport oxygen and carbon dioxide to and from body cells. Bison has what most nutrition conscious people want, lots of iron and less fat. Bison meat was one of the five foods recommended for women in the July 2001 issue of the Reader’s Digest article, “Five Foods Men and Women Need Most”.

Image

Bison Cooking Tips

General Guidelines ....
Cook it slowly at a low temperature. Don’t cook past medium.
Here are some tips for different cuts.

Steaks (grill, broil, or pan-broil)

Use steak ¾ to 1 inch thick
Place in lightly oiled skillet and use medium heat on stove top
Place buffalo on BBQ or 6 inches from the heat source in broiler
Cook 4 – 5 minutes per side
To increase tenderness, marinate sirloin tip and inside round steaks for 8- 24 hours

Roasts (sirloin tip, inside round)

Sear roast in oven at 500°F (260°C) or on stove in a hot pan
Season roast, add ¼ cup (50 mL) of liquid (water or red wine)
Roast at 325°F (165°C) in covered pan or place in slow cooker
Cook roast to medium rare 145°F (63°C)

Roasts (rib, loin and tenderloin)

Use uncovered pan with rack
Season as desired to taste
Cook at 275°F (135°C)
Do not cook past medium 155°F (68°C)

Burger
Cook ground meats to 160°F (70°C) internal temperature
Make sure all patties sit flat on grill for entire cooking time.
Cooking equipment should maintain temperature of 375°F (190°C) even when loading continuously with frozen patties
Ground bison should always be cooked until no pink remains

Recipes
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
User avatar
Antipatros
 
Posts: 721
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:33 pm

Spring lamb

Postby Antipatros » Sun Feb 05, 2012 6:05 pm

One of my favourite cookbooks -- not least because it was free.

Jehane Benoit was probably the foremost authority on traditional Canadian (especially Quebecois) cooking. When Panasonic wanted to convince Canadians that their microwaves could do more than pop corn or reheat yesterday's coffee, they hired Madame Benoit as their spokeswoman.

Jehane Benoit, Cooking Lamb...for sheer pleasure

http://www.cansheep.ca/cms/en/Resources/Recipes/Recipes.aspx

The following recipes have been reprinted from Madame Jehane Benoit’s booklet, “Cooking Lamb… for sheer pleasure,” published by the Canada Sheep Council, March 1974:

Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
User avatar
Antipatros
 
Posts: 721
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:33 pm

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Antipatros » Mon Feb 06, 2012 4:15 pm

Venison Loin in Puff Pastry

(Chef Klaus Wokinger, La Chaumiere)

1 lb. puff pastry dough
2½ lbs. tenderloin
salt and pepper
4 tbsp. olive oil
9 ozs. fresh spinach
flour
10 slices Black Forest ham
1 egg yolk mixed with 1 tbsp. water

Madeira sauce:

1 onion, chopped
2 stalks celery, chopped
2 carrots, chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 lb. chicken livers
Venison bones
2 tbsp. tomato paste
Bay leaves, thyme, rosemary, juniper berries
Flour
1 cup red or white wine
Water
¼ cup Madeira
salt and pepper

Start with sauce. Saute chopped vegetables with chicken livers and bones until browned. Add tomato paste, herbs, and 3 tbsp. flour and continue stirring. Deglaze pan with ¼ cup of wine and ¼ cup of cold water, stirring well and bringing back to a boil. Continue cooking and deglazing sauce with wine and water over a 2 hour period, until the sauce is rich and flavourful.

Mix 1 cup of this game sauce with Madeira, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and simmer until slightly thickened.

Meanwhile, season tenderloin with salt and pepper. Heat oil in a heavy pan over high heat and sear the meat on all sides. Remove meat and set aside to cool.

Wash spinach and blanch in boiling water for 2 minutes. Cool in ice water, drain, and squeeze out excess water.

Roll out puff pastry to about 1/8" thick. The pastry should be one inch longer* than the loin and three times as wide. Sprinkle flour on a baking sheet and lay puff pastry on sheet.

Centre 4 ham slices along one end of the pastry, leaving ½" border. Spread 1/3 of spinach on ham and lay tenderloin on top. Cover meat with the rest of ham and spinach. Brush edges of pastry with egg yolk mixture and fold pastry over meat. Press edges together with a fork to seal.

Brush pastry with egg mixture and poke with a fork to allow steam to escape during cooking. Bake for 25-30 minutes at 400F for medium rare. For medium, lower temperature to 350F and bake an additional 10-15 minutes. Let meat rest for at least 10 minutes in a warm place, cutting off end* of pastry and tilting pan to allow juices to escape. Slice and serve with Madeira sauce.

Serves 10.

*Note that the puff pastry must be longer than stated if one is to enclose the ends of the loin.
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
User avatar
Antipatros
 
Posts: 721
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:33 pm

Cassoulet

Postby Antipatros » Mon Feb 06, 2012 5:10 pm

Baked Beans Languedoc Style

(Jacques Burdick, French Cooking En Famille)

1 lb. dried white beans
½ lb. bacon, chopped
1 tbsp. coarse salt
1 tsp. dried rosemary (or 1 tbsp. fresh)
1 tsp. pepper
1½ lbs. lamb roast, cut into cubes
1 lb. mild Italian sausage
½ tsp. ground cloves
¼ tsp. dried thyme
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 onion, chopped
1 tomato, chopped
2 tbsp. tomato paste

Topping:

1 cup dry breadcrumbs
½ cup melted butter
½ tsp. black pepper
2 tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
2 cloves garlic, minced

Wash beans in colander and put them in a large pot with 3 cups of water. Bring to a boil, take them off the heat and let sit for 40 minutes. Rinse. Place half of the bacon in bottom of kettle and put beans on top, along with 1 tbsp. coarse salt and 4 cups water. Cover and simmer beans on low heat for 1½ hours.

Meanwhile, mix the thyme, rosemary, pepper and garlic and rub over the cubes of lamb. Heat oil and brown the meat with the remaining bacon and the onion. (Or use leftover meat: brown the bacon, garlic and herbs and add the meat later.) Add the tomato, ground cloves and tomato paste to the meat and set aside.

Cook the sausage in a pan or on the barbecue until browned. Cool and cut into bite-sized chunks.

In a crock pot, layer beans, lamb mixture and sausage. Add enough of the bean cooking water to come up to the top layer of beans. Cover and cook on low setting for 12 hours, adding more water if necessary. Or layer beans and meats in a heavy casserole and cook, covered, in a 350F oven for 2 hours.

Mix the topping ingredients and spread over the casserole during the last half hour and bake, uncovered, until golden. If using a slow cooker, transfer to an ovenproof dish, cover with crumbs, and brown under broiler.

Serves 8.
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
User avatar
Antipatros
 
Posts: 721
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:33 pm

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Antipatros » Mon Feb 06, 2012 5:36 pm

Cooking Tips

Ranched Elk is available in a wide variety of familiar cuts including: steaks, roasts, loins, ground, stew meat and sausages.

Ranched Elk is lean dark red meat with no marbling, it should be cooked either quickly on high heat or slow and low. Ranched Elk is best cooked to the medium stage.

Ranched Elk is ideal for barbecuing because it is so lean. Sear meat quickly on high heat to seal, then finish as desired.

Ranched Elk should not be cooked past the medium rare stage. If you like your steaks rare or medium rare, cook them exactly as you would a good beef steak.

Thick steaks benefit from being left to rest for a few minutes to ensure the pinkness is evenly spread. If you do not like your steaks pink, cook just past the medium rare stage and remove to warm oven and allow to rest for 5-15 minutes. The pinkness will disappear but the steaks will remain moist and tender.

Ranched Elk is tender and flavorful when roasted. Simply brown the meat all over to seal, add a little liquid, and roast to an internal temperature of 150-160F for desired doneness. Let roast rest 10 minutes before carving.

Do not use Mazola oil as it does not enhance ranched elk, try to use a good quality olive or other vegetable oil when cooking ranched elk.


Grilled Elk Steak with Roasted Garlic Sauce

(Chef Phil Joy)

4 x 8 oz. (225g each) elk grilling steaks
¼ cup (60 mL) balsamic vinegar
½ tsp. (2 mL) fresh ground pepper
¼ cup canola oil
2 tbsp. (30 mL) chopped green onion
1 tbsp. (15 mL) chopped fresh rosemary
Salt and fresh-ground pepper to taste

In a sealable plastic bag, combine the vinegar, pepper, oil, onion and rosemary. Add steaks, expel all of the air from the bag, and seal. Refrigerate for 8 hours or overnight.

Preheat the barbecue or broiler to 375F (190C). Remove steaks from marinade and pat dry. Discard marinade.

Grill steaks over medium heat, turning occasionally, to desired doneness.

Let stand 5 minutes before serving. Serve with roasted garlic sauce.

Serves 4.

Roasted Garlic Sauce

2 heads roasted garlic
2 tbsp. (30 mL) butter
2 tbsp. (30 mL) Dijon mustard
¼ cup (50 mL) dry white wine
1 cup (250 mL) whipping cream
⅓ cup (75 mL) Parmesan cheese, grated
Pinch grated numeg
Salt and fresh-ground pepper to taste

Squeeze pulp from raosted garlic and mash with the back of a fork. Set aside.

Heat a medium-sized non-stick saucepan to medium. Add butter and, when melted, add the garlic pulp. Saute for 2 to 3 minutes, then whisk in the Dijon mustard. Add the wine and cream and bring to a boil. Add cheese and nutmeg and simmer until sauce thickens slightly.
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
User avatar
Antipatros
 
Posts: 721
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:33 pm

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Antipatros » Tue Feb 07, 2012 8:31 pm

Stuffed Chicken Breast and Garlic Potatoes

(Chef Bill Bracken, Four Seasons Newport Beach)

8 chicken breasts

Chicken marinade:
½ lb. chopped bell pepper
½ onion, chopped
1 jalapeno, chopped
1 poblano pepper, chopped
¼ cup balsamic vinegar
6 ozs. beer
4 cups olive oil
½ cup soy sauce
1 tbsp. peppercorns

Stuffing:
7 ozs. shiitakes
4 ozs. morels
4 ozs. chanterelles
1 tbsp. diced shallots
2 tbsp. mixed herbs (rosemary, parsley and thyme)

Sauce:
2 ozs. concentrated chicken stock
1 tbsp. chopped dried tomatoes
1 tbsp. mixed herbs
½ oz. butter

Potatoes:
3 large potatoes
3 bulbs garlic
1½ ozs. butter
1½ tbsp. chopped parsley
1 qt. cereal cream

To make marinade, sauté peppers and onion until tender. Add remaining ingredients and let steep in the refrigerator for 24 hours. Marinate chicken breasts for 2 days.

For stuffing, sauté mushrooms and shallot in a little olive oil until tender. Season with herbs, salt and pepper.

To stuff marinated breasts, carefully butterfly each one by cutting from the middle of the thick side and folding out like a book. Pound lightly between layers of waxed paper until cutlets are even. Place 2 ozs. of stuffing down the middle of each breast and roll up, being careful to enclose all the stuffing. Tie up and roast in a 375F oven for 10 minutes or until barely cooked through. Let rest for 5 minutes before slicing and fanning out.

To make sauce, place the concentrated chicken stock (jus de poulet), tomatoes and herbs in a small pot and bring to a boil. Whip in butter and season. Serve at once over chicken.

For potatoes, peel and dice potatoes and boil until tender. Drain and mash. Roast garlic bulbs, cut in half, in 400F oven for 20 minutes. Cool, peel and place in pot with cream and bring to a boil. Simmer 15 minutes. Puree garlic cream in blender or food processor. Whip potatoes with garlic cream and butter to make a smooth mashed potato mixture.

Serves 6.
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
User avatar
Antipatros
 
Posts: 721
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:33 pm

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Antipatros » Wed Feb 08, 2012 3:23 pm

Saskatoons are, in general, smaller and drier than blueberries, and also taste more like cabernet sauvignon. Still, blueberries would be the closest substitute.

Elk Tenderloin in Saskatoon Berry Wine Sauce

(Chef Phil Joy)

http://www.albertaelk.com/recipes/monthly.php?tenderloin

1½ lb. elk tenderloin, silver skin removed
1 tbsp. olive oil
½ cup Saskatoon berries
2 tbsp. Bridgeberry Farms Rhubarb syrup
¼ cup red wine
¼ cup brown sauce (recommend: Knorr Demi Glace)
Salt and fresh-ground pepper to taste

Cut each tenderloin into 2 oz. medallions, flatten slightly with a meat hammer and season to taste. Heat a 10” non–stick skillet to medium-high. Add 1 tbsp. olive oil, when hot; sauté medallions until browned on each side (medium rare). Remove from pan and set aside. Add 1 tsp. olive oil and Saskatoon berries to pan, stir until lightly warmed. Add rhubarb syrup, red wine and Demi Glace. Bring mixture to a boil then reduce heat and simmer until liquid has reduced by half. Return medallions to pan to coat in sauce and reheat. Arrange medallions on serving plates and drizzle with sauce and serve immediately.
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
User avatar
Antipatros
 
Posts: 721
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:33 pm

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Marcus » Wed Feb 08, 2012 7:21 pm

Sounds good, Antipatros. Personally I'd skip the sauce in favor of morels fried in butter . . :)
"The jawbone of an ass is just as dangerous a weapon today as in Sampson's time."
--- Richard Nixon
******************
"I consider looseness with words no less of a defect than looseness of the bowels."
—John Calvin
User avatar
Marcus
 
Posts: 2409
Joined: Tue Dec 27, 2011 2:23 pm
Location: Alaska

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Antipatros » Wed Feb 08, 2012 8:35 pm

Marcus wrote:Sounds good, Antipatros. Personally I'd skip the sauce in favor of morels fried in butter . . :)

Morel picking should be good here in a couple of months. Lots of controlled burns last year, and lots of wildfires.
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
User avatar
Antipatros
 
Posts: 721
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:33 pm

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Marcus » Wed Feb 08, 2012 10:41 pm

Antipatros wrote:Morel picking should be good here in a couple of months. Lots of controlled burns last year, and lots of wildfires.


Tell me where you're located, and I'll come help . . ;)

Used to pick a year's worth of the big white ones every spring when we lived in Michigan's UP . . so many I had to build a dryer to handle them all.

Where are you getting the elk? Shoot it? Farmed elk? We buy grass-fed buffalo every summer from a guy who raises it in the lower-48 and brings freezers full up here to sell. Runs about $9/pound for a mixed, 25/pound bag, mostly burger.
"The jawbone of an ass is just as dangerous a weapon today as in Sampson's time."
--- Richard Nixon
******************
"I consider looseness with words no less of a defect than looseness of the bowels."
—John Calvin
User avatar
Marcus
 
Posts: 2409
Joined: Tue Dec 27, 2011 2:23 pm
Location: Alaska

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Antipatros » Thu Feb 09, 2012 4:06 am

We usually go to a ranch just outside Calgary, Cdn. Rocky Mountain Ranch. They produce their own bison and elk (occasionally caribou) for their resorts and restaurants.

Here is their current product and price list. They also run unadvertised specials. Amazingly enough, during last year's Christmas party season they sold bison tenderloin for about 25% less than filet mignon costs in the supermarkets.
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
User avatar
Antipatros
 
Posts: 721
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:33 pm

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Antipatros » Thu Feb 09, 2012 4:32 am

Asparagus or Fiddlehead Stir Fry

1 lb. round steak
1 lb. asparagus, trimmed (or 1 lb. fiddleheads, steamed)
¼ cup peanut oil
½ ea. small red and yellow peppers, trimmed
½ tsp. hot pepper sauce
1 tsp. cornstarch
1 tsp. minced fresh ginger
1 clove garlic, minced
Pinch of sugar
1 tsp. sesame oil
2 tbsp. soy sauce

Trim steak and cut with grain into paper-thin slices. Place in a small bowl and marinate with 1 tbsp. of the soy sauce and the cornstarch for 30 minutes. Cut asparagus diagonally into 2” pieces and set aside.

In wok, heat 2 tbsp. of oil over high heat and stir in garlic and ginger. Add asparagus and stir fry for 1 minute. Sprinkle with water and sugar. Cover and cook 4 more minutes. Add peppers and stir fry 1 minute. Transfer to warm platter.

Heat remaining oil over high heat and stir fry meat for 2-3 minutes. Stir in remaining soy sauce, hot pepper sauce, and sesame oil. Return vegetables to pan and heat through. Thicken with cornstarch solution if necessary.

Food Safety Tips for Fiddleheads

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/securit/kitchen-cuisine/fiddlehead-fougere-eng.php

Fiddleheads are the curled, edible shoots of the ostrich fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris). They are considered a seasonal delicacy in many parts of Canada. Fiddleheads are collected in the wild, sold as a seasonal vegetable or served in restaurants. They are also sold in cans or as a frozen product.

Potential foodborne illness

A number of outbreaks of foodborne illness from eating raw or undercooked fiddleheads have been reported in Canada and the United States since 1994. Studies to date have not determined the cause of these illnesses.

Under no circumstances should fiddleheads be eaten raw. Proper handling and thorough cooking of fiddleheads can reduce the risk of foodborne illness.

Cleaning fresh fiddleheads

•Remove as much of the brown papery husk as possible, using your fingers.
•Wash the fiddleheads in several changes of fresh cold water to remove any residual husk or dirt.

Cooking fiddleheads

Before eating fiddleheads, make sure to follow these steps:
•Cook them in a generous amount of boiling water for 15 minutes or steam them for 10 to 12 minutes. Discard water used for boiling or steaming fiddleheads.
•Follow these instructions before sautéing, frying, baking or making other foods (e.g. soups, casseroles) using fiddleheads....
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
User avatar
Antipatros
 
Posts: 721
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:33 pm

Re: Gastronomy

Postby Antipatros » Mon Feb 13, 2012 5:05 pm

Longer cooking of the fiddleheads may be desirable, as per the Health Canada warning above:

Cream of Fiddlehead Soup

2 shallots, minced
1 tbsp. butter
¼ cup carrots, diced
¼ cup thinly-sliced leeks
1½ cups fresh fiddleheads (reserve ½ cup for garnish)
2 qts. veal or chicken stock
salt and pepper
1 cup heavy cream
2 egg yolks

Sauté shallots in butter for 10 minutes. Toss in carrots, leeks, and fiddleheads. Add stock, salt and pepper, bring to a boil, and simmer 30 minutes. Blend cream and yolks. Pour into soup; heat slowly and do not boil. Boil remaining fiddleheads 6 minutes in salted water. Use for garnish.

Serves 6.
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
User avatar
Antipatros
 
Posts: 721
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 7:33 pm

Next

Return to Art + Architecture

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest