Gastronomy

A little song, a little dance, a little seltzer down your pants.

Punch

Postby Antipatros » Wed Oct 31, 2012 2:59 pm

The entertaining season is fast approaching, whether you conceive it as Hallowe'en, Michaelmas through Hogmanay, Hanukkah, Christmas, New Year's, Grey Cup through Super Bowl, or some other formulation.

The Concise Oxford Dictionary actually lists the origin of "punch" in this sense as "17th c.; orig. unkn.", but this charming version is often encountered and may even be true:

Punch (drink)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punch_(drink)

Punch is the term for a wide assortment of drinks, both non-alcoholic and alcoholic, generally containing fruit or fruit juice. The drink was introduced from India to England in the early seventeenth century; from there its use spread to other countries. Punch is typically served at parties in large, wide bowls, known as punch bowls.

History

The word punch is a loanword from Hindi panch (meaning five) and the drink was originally made with five ingredients: alcohol, sugar, lemon, water, and tea or spices. The original drink was named paantsch.

The drink was brought to England from India by sailors and employees of the British East India Company in the early seventeenth century. From there it was introduced into other European countries. When served communally, the drink is expected to be of a lower alcohol content than a typical cocktail.

The term punch was first recorded in British documents in 1632. At the time, most punches were of the Wassail type made with a wine or brandy base. But around 1655, Jamaican rum came into use and the 'modern' punch was born. By 1671, documents make references to punch houses....

Some old (1950s and '60s) recipes from my parents:

Rum Punch

1½ 25 oz. bottle Maraca Rum
1½ 30 oz. bottle ginger ale
Juice of 12 oranges (approx. 20 ozs.)
6 oz. pineapple juice
¾ cup powdered sugar

Stir gently. Pour over a block of ice in a large bowl.

Rye Punch

1½ 25 oz. bottles rye whisky
1 30 oz. bottle ginger ale
1 30 oz. bottle soda water
Juice of 12 oranges (approx. 20 ozs.)
Juice of 6 lemons (approx. 10 ozs.)
1 cup brown sugar

Pour into large bowl and add lumps of ice. Add 1 dozen slices of oranges and 4 slices of quartered pineapple. Stir gently and serve.

Gin Punch

2 25 oz. bottles Crystal Gin
⅓ cup fruit sugar
18 ozs. orange juice
4 ozs. lemon juice
6 ozs. pineapple juice
1 30 oz. bottle Tom Collins mix
1 30 oz. bottle soda water

Pour over block of ice in large punch bowl. Garnish with slices of orange and lemon.

EDIT:

12 party punch recipes

Top 20 punch recipes - Allrecipes.com
Last edited by Antipatros on Wed Oct 31, 2012 7:50 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
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Re: Gastronomy

Postby Antipatros » Wed Oct 31, 2012 3:43 pm

From Lorenza de' Medici, Lorenza's Italian Seasons:

Limoncello

Lemon Liqueur

Limoncello has become very popular in recent years and as we have a few lemon trees in the garden, I make this liqueur myself. Sometimes I will add a few sage leaves to the lemon zest, for a slightly bitter taste. The pure alcohol content is 95% and is sold in drug stores, or drogherie, in Italy. Some recipes give instructions for making a syrup with hot water and sugar, a method which results in an opaque limoncello. This recipe will give you a transparent liquid.

12 organic lemons
750g/1 lb. 10 ozs./4 cups granulated sugar
1 litre/1¾ pints/4 cups alcohol (90-95%)
1 litre/1¾ pints/4 cups water

Remove the zest from the lemons with a zester, making sure you don't cut through to the white pith. Divide the zest between 3 sterilized wine bottles, adding the sugar, alcohol, and water. Seal with a cork.

Put the bottles in a dark cupboard and turn the bottles every day for a couple of months, until the sugar has completely dissolved. Filter the liquid through a paper filter into clean bottles and serve at room temperature or chilled. This liqueur will keep for a long time.

Makes 2.2 litres/3¾ pints

Sciroppo di Vino

Wine Syrup

After a wine tasting in our winery at Badia a Coltibuono, there are often many unfinished bottles of wine left open, so I always make this syrup to use them up. It keeps for many months at room temperature, does not have to be stored in special places and is good on fruit salads, with strawberries or berries, as well as with ice-cream and as a glaze for fruit tarts.

1 litre/1¾ pints/4 cups red wine
Juice of 6 lemons and grated zest of 1
450g/1 lb./2¾ cups granulated sugar
1 stick cinnamon
8 cloves

Boil the wine with the rest of the ingredients in a large stainless steel pan or preserving pan, for 20 minutes. Allow to completely cool, then strain through a fine colander. Decant into a sterilized bottle and store in a cupboard or dark place. This is delicious with fresh fruit, ice-cream and soft cakes.

Makes about 1 litre/1¾ pints/4 cups
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
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More comfort food

Postby Antipatros » Fri Nov 02, 2012 2:20 pm

From this morning's Test Kitchen Notes email:

Lighter Chicken and Dumplings

Why this recipe works: Chicken and dumplings make chicken pot pie look easy. There’s no disguising a leaden dumpling. One goal was to develop a dumpling that was light yet substantial, and tender yet durable. The other was to develop a well-rounded recipe that, like chicken pot pie, included vegetables, therein supplying the cook with a complete meal in one dish. Dumplings can contain myriad ingredients, and there are just as many different ways to mix them. We tried them all—with disastrous results. But when we stumbled on a unique method of adding warm liquid rather than cold to the flour and fat, our dumplings were great—firm but light and fluffy. The reason? The heat expands and sets the flour so that the dumplings don’t absorb liquid in the stew. The best-tasting dumplings were made with all-purpose flour, whole milk, and the chicken fat left from browning the chicken.

http://www.americastestkitchen.com/recipes/detail.php?docid=20282&Extcode=L2MN1AA00

Serves 6

We strongly recommend buttermilk for the dumplings, but it’s acceptable to substitute ½ cup plain yogurt thinned with ¼ cup milk. If you want to include white meat (and don’t mind losing a bit of flavor in the process), replace 2 chicken thighs with 2 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves (about 8 ounces each). Brown the chicken breasts along with the thighs and remove them from the stew once they reach an internal temperature of 160 degrees, 20 to 30 minutes. The collagen in the wings helps thicken the stew; do not omit or substitute. Since the wings yield only about 1 cup of meat, using their meat is optional. The stew can be prepared through step 3 up to 2 days in advance; bring the stew back to a simmer before proceeding with the recipe.

Ingredients

Stew

6 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs (about 2 1/2 pounds), trimmed of excess fat (see note)
Table salt and ground black pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
2 small onions, chopped fine (about 1 1/2 cups)
2 medium carrots, peeled and cut into 3/4-inch pieces (about 2 cups)
1 celery rib, medium, chopped fine (about 1/2 cup)
1/4 cup dry sherry
6 cups low-sodium chicken broth
1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme leaves
1 pound chicken wings (see note)
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley leaves

Dumplings

2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour (10 ounces)
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon table salt
3/4 cup buttermilk, cold (see note)
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, melted and cooled about 5 minutes
1 large egg white

Instructions

1. FOR THE STEW Pat chicken thighs dry with paper towels and season with 1 teaspoon salt and ¼ teaspoon pepper. Heat oil in large Dutch oven over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add chicken thighs, skin-side down, and cook until skin is crisp and well browned, 5 to 7 minutes. Using tongs, turn chicken pieces and brown on second side, 5 to 7 minutes longer; transfer to large plate. Discard all but 1 teaspoon fat from pot.

2. Add onions, carrots, and celery to now-empty pot; cook, stirring occasionally, until caramelized, 7 to 9 minutes. Stir in sherry, scraping up any browned bits. Stir in broth and thyme. Return chicken thighs, with any accumulated juices, to pot and add chicken wings. Bring to simmer, cover, and cook until thigh meat offers no resistance when poked with tip of paring knife but still clings to bones, 45 to 55 minutes.

3. Remove pot from heat and transfer chicken to cutting board. Allow broth to settle 5 minutes, then skim fat from surface using wide spoon or ladle. When cool enough to handle, remove and discard skin from chicken. Using fingers or fork, pull meat from chicken thighs (and wings, if desired) and cut into 1-inch pieces. Return meat to pot.

4. FOR THE DUMPLINGS Whisk flour, baking soda, sugar, and salt in large bowl. Combine buttermilk and melted butter in medium bowl, stirring until butter forms small clumps; whisk in egg white. Add buttermilk mixture to dry ingredients and stir with rubber spatula until just incorporated and batter pulls away from sides of bowl.

5. Return stew to simmer; stir in parsley and season with salt and pepper to taste. Using greased tablespoon measure (or #60 portion scoop), scoop level amount of batter and drop over top of stew, spacing about ¼ inch apart (you should have about 24 dumplings). Wrap lid of Dutch oven with clean kitchen towel (keeping towel away from heat source) and cover pot. Simmer gently until dumplings have doubled in size and toothpick inserted into center comes out clean, 13 to 16 minutes. Serve immediately.

Technique

No More Broken Sinkers

Here's how we lightened up our dumplings and kept them intact.

ADD AN EGG WHITE
Adding an egg white helps develop light-as-air dumplings that don't disintegrate.

LET LIQUID SIMMER
Waiting to add the dumplings until the broth is simmering sets their bottoms and keeps them whole.

CATCH CONDENSATION
Wrapping the lid with a towel absorbs excess moisture that can turn dumplings soggy.

Technique

Best Parts for Broth

NATURAL THICKENER
The multiple joints in chicken wings contain lots of collagen that converts into gelatin during cooking—a better broth thickener than flour, which masks chicken flavor.

FULL O' FLAVOR
Pound for pound, chicken thighs impart richer flavor to broth than any other part of the bird. Plus, they require far less cooking time than eking the flavor out of a whole bird or carcass.
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
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Re: Gastronomy

Postby Parodite » Sun Nov 04, 2012 10:09 pm

Outside, away from the noise, grows a flower.
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Recipes for Hope and Change

Postby Antipatros » Wed Nov 07, 2012 5:19 pm

From a Kenyan cookbook borrowed from a friend years ago:

Sukuma Wiki

Probably the best way to stretch leftovers to feed a hungry family. The name means literally "push the week."

500g (1 lb.) kale or other greens such as spinach
2 tbsp. oil
1-2 onions, chopped
2-4 tomatoes, peeled and chopped
1 green pepper, chopped (optional)
leftover meat
salt and pepper to taste

Heat oil in a large frying pan. Fry onions until soft. Add tomatoes, green pepper and leftover meat, if you have any. Cook together until well heated. Add greens and cook over low heat for 20-30 minutes until mixture is well blended. Season to taste.

Serves 4.

Chapatis

Use chapatis instead of forks for transporting food to the mouth. It takes practice, but the food taste better that way!

125g (4 oz.) or 1 cup white flour
125g (4 oz.) or 1 cup wholewheat flour
½ tsp. salt
1 tbsp. oil
water to make a dough
1 tbsp. softened butter or ghee (clarified butter)

Sift flours and salt together in a bowl. Add oil and enough cold water to make a stiff dough. Knead for 5-8 minutes until satiny and elastic. Cover with a damp cloth and let stand for 2-3 hours. Knead again and divide into balls, about 3-4 cm.(1-1½ ins.) in diameter. Roll into flat pancakes about 7 cm. (3 in.) in diameter. Heat a griddle or frying pan. Wipe lightly with oil, butter or ghee. Place chapati in pan and cook until it begins to puff up. Press with a spatula to assist the puffing up process. This ensures light and fluffy chapatis. Turn over and repeat the process. Remove from pan and place in foil or a cloth, spreading butter on the top of each chapati. Serve immediately.

Serves 6.

Ethiopian Grilled Kebabs

A characteristic dish from the ancient culture of Ethiopia

1.25 kg (2½ lbs.) rump or fillet steak
1 tbsp. Ethiopian red pepper (deleh)*
1 tsp. salt
¼ tsp. black pepper
1 tbsp. each of freshly chopped ginger and garlic pounded together
2 tbsp. of any liquor
2 tbsp. cooking oil

Remove fat from meat and slice meat into long, thin pieces. Mix all the other ingredients with the meat and marinate for 6 hours or more. Prepare a charcoal fire. When hot, place meat on skewers and grill. Serve with a green salad and, if possible, injera and red peppers.

Serves 4.

*Appears to be a variety of cayenne (2.4 Capsicum annuum L.)

From Carnivore restaurant outside Nairobi:

Carnivore Garlic Sauce

This garlic sauce goes well with any roast meat. Chris's recipe makes enough for an army.

400g (1 lb.) peeled, cooked potatoes
1 tsp. salt
10 cloves garlic, crushed
1 egg yolk
1 tbsp. lemon juice
500 mL (16 fl. oz. or 2 cups) salad oil
freshly ground black pepper

Mash potatoes. Add salt, garlic, egg yolk and lemon juice. Beat well. Slowly pour in oil, as though making mayonnaise, until mixture is light and fluffy. Add black pepper to taste. Serve warm or cold.

Makes approximately 3 cups of sauce.

Game Marinade

Guaranteed to tenderise the toughest old impala.

6 cloves garlic, halved
4 cloves garlic
1 tbsp. salt
1 bottle red wine
250 mL (8 fl. oz. or 1 cup) lime juice
1 tbsp. chopped fresh tarragon
½ cup red onions, diced
2 tbsp. freshly ground black pepper

Stab joint with a sharp knife and put garlic pieces into holes. Crush remaining garlic with salt. In a large bowl, mix all ingredients together. Pour marinade over joint and leave overnight. If joint is not completely covered, turn after four hours. Use marinade to baste when roasting, and to make gravy. [BOIL for at least 10 minutes.]

Marinade is sufficient for a 2 kg. (4 lb.) joint.

From Le Chateau restaurant:

Rack of Gazelle Amboseli

Substitute rack of any tender game meat for this uniquely Kenyan recipe.

1 rack of gazelle, approx. 1.2 kg (2½ lbs.)
185g (6 ozs.) unsalted bacon
4 tbsp. cooking oil
2 small mangos
2 tbsp. butter
45g (1½ oz. or 1/3 cup) cashew nuts
250 mL (8 fl. oz. or 1 cup) red wine
3 tbsp. cranberries
2 tots brandy
250 mL (8 fl. oz. or 1 cup) brown sauce [HP Sauce]

Season rack lightly with salt and pepper. Preheat oven to 230⁰C, 450⁰F or Gas Mark 8. Cover rack with thin slices of bacon and bind with string. Heat oil in a large roasting pan. Put larded rack in pan and place in oven for 20 minutes. Remove bacon and return rack to oven for another 5 minutes to brown. While rack is in the oven, cut mangos in half and remove flesh, leaving skin-shells intact. Set mango shells aside. Dice flesh. Heat butter ina frying pan and add mango and cashew nuts. Deglaze with half the red wine and simmer. Place mango shells on a serving dish. Remove rack from oven and drain off oil. Add cranberries to pan and deglaze with remaining red wine and brandy. Simmer for 2 minutes. Add brown sauce. Simmer for another 5 minutes and season to taste. Fill mango shells with mango and cashewnut mixture and arrange around carved rack on a large dish, accompanied by noodles, croquette potatoes and Brussels sprouts. Serve sauce separately.

Serves 4.
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
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Recipes for Hope and Change 2

Postby Antipatros » Wed Nov 07, 2012 9:04 pm

From The Horseman restaurant in Karen, a Nairobi suburb:

Zanzibar Coconut and Fish Soup

An exquisite soup with just a hint of coconut.

1 coconut
1.25 L (2 pints or 5 cups) hot water
4 tbsp. cooking oil
1 kg (2 lbs.) seafish, boned and cut into 1 cm. (½ in.) cubes
250 g (8 oz.) celery, finely chopped
250 g (8 oz.) leeks, finely chopped
2 onions, finely chopped
2 tsp. curry powder
salt and pepper to taste
1 tsp. chopped garlic
1 green chilli, chopped
1.5 L (2½ pints or 6 cups) fish stock, from fish bones and celery and leek trimmings
1 kg (2 lbs.) tomatoes, peeled and chopped
2 bunches coriander [cilantro], chopped
juice of 3 limes

Grate coconut. Pour hot water over shredded flesh. Let stand 30 minutes. Strain through a cloth or strainer and reserve coconut milk. Heat oil in a large saucepan. Add fish cubes, celery, leeks and onions. Fry for 3-4 minutes. Add curry powder, salt, pepper, garlic and chilli. Stir in coconut milk and fish stock. Add tomatoes and simmer for 10 minutes. Throw in chopped coriander [cilantro] and lime juice just before serving.

Serves 10.

From Makaa Grill:

Ménage à Trois

This rather naughtily-named salad was inspired by Chef Gorman's three favourite exotic ingredients. Chef said the warm dish goes against all the rules, which led him to name it "three in a bed." He cautions care if your guests phone to ask you what's on the menu.

3 tbsp. butter
24 finely chopped cashew nuts
½ clove garlic, chopped
½ small root ginger, peeled and chopped
12 small crab claws, boiled and shelled
1 large ripe mango, peeled, stoned and sliced
¼ cup small mange-tout (snow peas)
8 limes
1 pinch chopped dill

In a large frying pan, melt butter over medium heat until foaming. Add cashews, garlic and ginger and cook slowly for 5-6 minutes until nuts are beginning to brown. Add crab claws, mango, blanched peas and juice from 4 limes. Sauté until thoroughly warmed, mixing ingredients well. Turn out intofour warm crab shells or small dishes. Sprinkle with chopped dill and garnish with remaining limes. Serve as a starter with garlic toast.

Prawns Upanga

Upanga is Swahili for sword -- which explains the name of these skewered prawns served at the Makaa Grill.

12 king prawns, peeled and deveined
60 g (2 oz. or ¼ cup) butter
½ fresh-peeled root ginger, finely chopped
250 mL (8 fl. oz. or 1 cup) fresh double cream
12 passion fruit/grenadillas or 4 tbsp. passion fruit juice
125 mL (4 fl. oz. or ½ cup) medium-dry white wine (try Papaya)

Melt butter over gentle heat in a large frying pan with ginger. Add prawns and reduce heat to very low. When prawns turn pinky-white on the underside turn them over. Remove when almost cooked and place on absorbent kitchen paper. Tip remaining butter from pan, taking care to retain sediment. Return pan to minimal heat. Add contents of passion fruit (or passion fruit juice) and cook till reduced by a third. Add wine and simmer gently until reduced by half. If the passion fruit are not sweet enough, add brown sugar to taste. Remove from heat and add prawns and cream. Return to heat and simmer, turning prawns once to ensure even cooking. Serve by skewering prawns with tiny swords. Strain sauce over and garnish with half a passion fruit and a suitable flower.

Serves 4.

From a different Kenyan cookbook:

La Mangue Flambé à la Sinbad

2 medium ripe mangos
2 tbsp. butter
2 tbsp. sugar
juice of 1 orange
¼ cup mango juice (tinned)
¼ cup Grand Marnier
1 cup double cream (slightly whipped)

Cut the mangos in half and remove the seed. Peel, and cut the flesh into ½-in. cubes. Preheat a frying pan. Toss in butter and add sugar, mixing with a wooden spoon for 30 seconds. Add juices and simmer before adding Grand Marnier. Flame, then reduce the liquid by one-third before adding mangos. Remove from the heat and allow to cool for a few minutes before genlty folding in the semi-whipped cream.

Serves 4.
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
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Re: Gastronomy

Postby Antipatros » Thu Nov 08, 2012 4:09 am

Auguste Escoffier, A Guide to Modern Cookery (1907)

http://archive.org/details/cu31924000610117

Preface

If the art of Cookery in all its branches were not undergoing a process of evolution, and if its canons could be once and for ever fixed, as are those of certain scientific operations and mathematical procedures, the present work would have no raison d'être; inasmuch as there already exist several excellent culinary text-books in the English language. But everything is so unstable in these times of progress at any cost, and social customs and methods of life alter so rapidly, that a few years now suffice to change completely the face of usages which at their inception bade fair to outlive the age — so enthusiastically were they welcomed by the public.

In regard to the traditions of the festal board, it is but twenty years ago since the ancestral English customs began to make way before the newer methods, and we must look to the great impetus given to travelling by steam traction and navigation, in order to account for the gradual but unquestionable revolution.

In the wake of the demand came the supply. Palatial hotels were built, sumptuous restaurants were opened, both of which offered their customers luxuries undreamt of theretofore in such establishments.

Modern society contracted the habit of partaking of light suppers in these places, after the theatres of the Metropolis had closed; and the well-to-do began to flock to them on Sundays, in order to give their servants the required weekly rest. And, since restaurants allow of observing and of being observed, since they are eminently adapted to the exhibiting of magnificent dresses, it was not long before they entered into the life of Fortune's favourites.

But these new-fangled habits had to be met by novel methods of Cookery — better adapted to the particular environment in which they were to be practised. The admirable productions popularised by the old Masters of the Culinary Art of the preceding Century did not become the light and more frivolous atmosphere of restaurants ; were, in fact, ill-suited to the brisk waiters, and their customers who only had eyes for one another.

The pompous splendour of those bygone dinners, served in the majestic dining-halls of Manors and Palaces, by liveried footmen, was part and parcel of the etiquette of Courts and lordly mansions.

It is eminently suited to State dinners, which are in sooth veritable ceremonies, possessing their ritual, traditions, and one might even say — their high priests; but it is a mere hindrance to the modern, rapid service. The complicated and sometimes heavy menus would be unwelcome to the hypercritical appetites so common nowadays; hence the need of a radical change not only in the culinary preparations themselves, but in the arrangements of the menus, and the service.

Circumstances ordained that I should be one of the movers in this revolution, and that I should manage the kitchens of two establishments which have done most to bring it about. I therefore venture to suppose that a book containing a record of all the changes which have come into being in kitchen work — changes whereof I am in a great part author — may have some chance of a good reception at the hands of the public, i.e., at the hands of those very members of it who have profited by the changes I refer to.

For it was only with the view of meeting the many and persistent demands for such a record that the present volume was written....
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
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Re: Gastronomy

Postby Antipatros » Fri Nov 09, 2012 3:36 am

This work offers a charming look at Georgian gastronomy. Keep it in mind for your next Jane Austen-themed costume party.

William Kitchiner, Apicius Redivivus (1817)

Or, The cook's oracle: wherein especially the art of composing soups, sauces, and flavouring essences is made so clear and easy ... being six hundred receipts, the result of actual experiments instituted in the kitchen of a physician, for the purpose of composing a culinary code for the rational epicure.

http://archive.org/details/apiciusredivivus00kitc
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
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Re: Gastronomy

Postby Antipatros » Fri Nov 09, 2012 4:51 pm

Pres. Obama may grant the White House turkey a pardon, but some of its country kin will not be so lucky.

Roast Wild Turkey with Walnut Stuffing and Mushroom Gravy

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/roast_wild_turkey_with_walnut_stuffing_and_mushroom_gravy.php

Portion size: 8 to 10

Wild turkeys are deliciously lean and flavourful but require a slightly different cooking method to keep the meat moist and tender. If you are lucky enough to get one, it makes a fabulous centrepiece.

Ingredients

1 wild turkey, 8 to 12 lb/3.5 to 5.4 kg
Walnut Stuffing recipe

3/4 tsp. (4 mL) salt
1/4 tsp. (1 mL) pepper
1/4 cup (60 mL) salted butter, softened
1/2 cup (125 mL) salted butter, melted
8 oz. (227 g) mushrooms, thinly sliced
2 tbsp. (30 mL) brandy
1/3 cup (75 mL) all-purpose flour
3 cups (750 mL) Turkey Stock with Bacon Rind recipe
2 tsp. (10 mL) lemon juice

Preparation:

Remove wing tips from turkey. Cut neck into 3 or 4 pieces. Cut heart and gizzard in half and rinse well under cold water. Set all pieces aside for stock.

Stuff turkey with Walnut Stuffing. Sprinkle with 1/2 tsp (2 mL) of the salt and pepper. Place, breast side down, on greased rack in roasting pan; rub with softened butter. Cover pan with foil; roast in 350°F (180°C) oven for 90 minutes.

Turn turkey breast side up. Soak double-thickness cheesecloth large enough to cover turkey in melted butter; place over turkey. Roast in 325°F (160°C) oven for about 12 minutes per pound (500 g), basting with pan drippings every 15 minutes and removing cheesecloth for last 20 minutes to baste often.

Transfer to serving platter and tent with foil; let stand for 15 minutes before carving.

Add mushrooms, brandy and remaining salt to pan juices; cook over medium-low heat until mushrooms are wilted, about 2 minutes. Sprinkle with flour; cook, stirring, for 3 minutes. Stir in stock; simmer until thickened, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in lemon juice. Serve in gravy boat along with turkey and stuffing.

Source: Canadian Living Magazine: October 2009

Walnut Stuffing

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/walnut_stuffing.php

Portion size: 13 cups (3.25 L)

Ingredients

1 pkg (14 g) dried porcini mushrooms
8 oz slab bacon
10 cups (2.4L) cubed bread
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) walnut halves
2 onions, chopped
3 ribs celery, chopped
3/4 cup (175 mL) chopped fresh parsley
1 tbsp. (15 mL) fresh thyme leaves
1-1/2 tsp. (7 mL) dried savory
1/2 tsp. (2 mL) salt
1/4 tsp. (1 mL) pepper
1 egg
1/3 cup (75 mL) Turkey Stock with Bacon Rind recipe

Preparation'

Soak porcini mushrooms in 1 cup (250 mL) water until softened; drain and finely chop. Set aside.

Remove rind from bacon; set aside for stock. Dice bacon; set aside separately.

Meanwhile, toast bread on baking sheet in 350°F (180°C) oven, 8 to 12 minutes; transfer to large bowl.

Spread walnuts on baking sheet and return to oven; toast lightly, about 5 minutes. Add to bowl.

In skillet, cook diced bacon over medium-low heat until lightly browned and fat is rendered. Add onions; cook over medium-high heat until softened. Add celery and soaked mushrooms; cook, stirring often, until celery is softened. Add to bread mixture.

Add parsley, thyme, savory, salt and pepper; mix well. Beat egg with stock; mix into stuffing.

Source : Canadian Living Magazine: October 2009

Turkey Stock with Bacon Rind

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/turkey_stock_with_bacon_rind.php

Portion size: 5 cups (1.25 L)

Ingredients

Turkey wing tips, neck, heart and gizzard
Bacon rind from stuffing
1 rib celery
1 onion, halved lengthwise
1 leek, halved lengthwise
1 carrot, chopped
3 sprigs fresh parsley
3 sprigs thyme
1/2 tsp. (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp. (2 mL) black peppercorns
2 whole cloves
1 bay leaf

Preparation

In large saucepan, bring turkey wing tips, neck, heart and gizzard, bacon rind and 5 cups (1.25 L) water to boil; skim off foam.

Add celery, onion, leek, carrot, parsley, thyme, salt, peppercorns, cloves and bay leaf; return to boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 3 hours. Strain.

Source: Canadian Living Magazine: October 2009
Be not too curious of Good and Evil;
Seek not to count the future waves of Time;
But be ye satisfied that you have light
Enough to take your step and find your foothold.

--T.S. Eliot
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cheese made from armpit and nose bacteria

Postby noddy » Mon Dec 03, 2012 4:55 am

Biologist Christina Agapakis and scent expert Sissel Tolaas worked on this unusual culinary sciences project as part of Synthetic Aesthetics, a synthetic biology project run by the University of Edinburgh and Stanford University. Agapakis was curious as to whether there might be human origins to some of our modern cheese flavors. So she got to swabbing armpits, hands, feet, and noses, inoculated milk with the swabs, and incubated now bacteria-filled milk. She used identical methods to strain and press the cheeses, getting a variety of flavors as a result.

So what does armpit cheese smell like? It depends on whose armpit it is.


http://io9.com/5964942/what-does-cheese ... taste-like
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Re: Gastronomy

Postby Crocus sativus » Sat Dec 08, 2012 8:31 pm

ATT00006.gif
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Re: Gastronomy

Postby Prunus persica » Wed Dec 19, 2012 8:06 pm

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Ski Hut Cassoulet

Postby Farcus » Sat Dec 22, 2012 1:48 am

1 lb dry Tarbais (Great Northern) beans, soaked overnight
1 tsp Beaumonde
1 tsp dry thyme
1 tsp rubbed sage
2 tsp dry tarragon
1/2 tsp creole salt (like Slap ya Mama, or Tony Chachere's)
2 bay leaves
2 heads garlic
2 bell peppers
1 small stalk celery
2 large onions
1/4 cup olive oil
1 cup white wine
6 cups chicken stock

1 ham bone, ham hock, or ham butt with bone
1 whole roasted chicken from grocery store (can be cold) - deboned except for legs, keep the skin and fat, breast halves should be roughly quartered.
1 3-3lb pork loin - sliced 3/4" thick
1 lb andouille, or some other spicy smoked sausage
3-5 loaves roasted garlic French bread

========================================================================================

Chop the veggies and 1 of the garlic heads irregularly and saute in the olive oil in a large pot on the stovetop until most of the liquid has cooked off.
Add 1/2 of the white wine. Cook at saute heat another few minutes until it almost cooks down.
Add spices, drained beans, chicken stock, and the rest of the wine. Bring to boil.
Add hambone, pork, and chicken.
Cover, bring back to boil, then simmer, covered, for ~ 1 hour.
Uncover. Turn up heat a little and continue simmering for at least another hour. Stir occasionally, but be careful if you've used a leftover ham bone with a lot of low-grade ham and gristle still attached. Also, make no attempt to remove the fatty layer just yet, we'll do this with a baster later.
Separate the remaining head of garlic and clean most of the paper off the toes. Throw the whole toes in the pot along with the last of the wine.
"Leftova wine? HELLO!!" -- Hazel Burke

Cook at a low simmer, uncovered, for another half hour to hour. Turn off heat and carefully remove the hambone (dig any marrow out and blend back into the beans), and chicken skin.
After this, Let it sit untouched for 20-30 minutes, and then remove most of the fat layer off the top with a turkey baster. A little fat is fine.

I like to split the hot andouille sausages, cook them in a pan so they're burnished, and serve them on the side. That way, you don't have the red pepper heat if you don't want it.


Serve the bean/meat over/with toasted slices of roasted garlic bread, and/or jasmine rice with about 20% wild rice and a nice red wine. Or white. It's all good!


There's about 30,000Kcals in that pot of food, which will stick to the ribs of a hutfull of hungry winterpeople after a cold day of no small calorie expenditure.

Cheers!
Last edited by Farcus on Sun Jan 06, 2013 9:49 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Gastronomy

Postby Demon of Undoing » Mon Dec 24, 2012 9:53 am

You get a last meal. What is it?

Mine? Grilled pork ribs with a mustard base- molasses based sauce. Garlic mashed potatoes , Zellwood sweet corn on the cob boiled in buttered water. Green beans with bacon and salt. And a gallon of lemonade, with apple pie.
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Re: Gastronomy

Postby noddy » Mon Dec 24, 2012 1:41 pm

sound delicious.

for me, i couldnt choose between.

a) a classic pea and ham soup made with bacon hocks
b) marron (crawdaddies) au natural (or maybe fried in butter n garlic and splashed in brandy)
c) beef and vege stew, cooked till the flavour is popping.

so id ask for a smorgasboard of all three, washed down with rum and ginger beer.
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Re: Gastronomy

Postby Heracleum Persicum » Tue Mar 19, 2013 9:43 am

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Re: Gastronomy

Postby Heracleum Persicum » Thu May 09, 2013 6:24 pm

.


www.conflictkitchen.org/




.



Changing Americans' Perception Of U.S. Adversaries, One Dish At A Time


A carry-out restaurant in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania that only serves food from countries with which the United States is in conflict.

.






.
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Re: Gastronomy

Postby Heracleum Persicum » Sun May 25, 2014 8:24 pm

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Re: Gastronomy

Postby Nonc Hilaire » Sat Jun 21, 2014 6:09 pm

“Christ has no body now but yours. Yours are the eyes through which he looks with compassion on this world. Yours are the feet with which he walks among His people to do good. Yours are the hands through which he blesses His creation.”

Teresa of Ávila
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Chocolate: First taste

Postby Nonc Hilaire » Wed Jul 30, 2014 2:21 am

“Christ has no body now but yours. Yours are the eyes through which he looks with compassion on this world. Yours are the feet with which he walks among His people to do good. Yours are the hands through which he blesses His creation.”

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Re: Gastronomy

Postby noddy » Wed Mar 18, 2015 2:12 am

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Casual chopsticks rest from wrapper

Postby Nonc Hilaire » Sat Aug 15, 2015 1:44 am

“Christ has no body now but yours. Yours are the eyes through which he looks with compassion on this world. Yours are the feet with which he walks among His people to do good. Yours are the hands through which he blesses His creation.”

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How to drink vodka like a Russian

Postby Nonc Hilaire » Thu Apr 07, 2016 10:10 pm

“Christ has no body now but yours. Yours are the eyes through which he looks with compassion on this world. Yours are the feet with which he walks among His people to do good. Yours are the hands through which he blesses His creation.”

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