Becoming an arbalist

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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby Simple Minded » Tue Jan 12, 2016 12:16 am

manolo wrote:
Simple Minded wrote:.45's are designed for very low penetration (war on women?). These two sentences alone would be enough for a few thousand professional crusaders in the US to "take up arms" against crossbows.


SM,

At least 45s are safer.

I had a very scary time today with my big crossbow. I got it strung,using a pulley device which reduces draw weight by 50%. Once cocked I couldn't get it uncocked!! Just not strong enough to hold back the poundage (without the pulley) whilst pulling the trigger with my third hand. :x The wife won't touch it, or even be in the same room.

Anyway, I made up some safety device with parachute cord and kind of 'rapelled' the bastard string gradually down, inch by inch. Phew! These things are blinking dangerous.

http://www.wfaa.com/story/news/local/in ... /19191991/

Alex.


Glad to hear you didn't get hurt. A cocked crossbow is a lot like an anvil perched on top of a step ladder. Don't take much to release that potential energy. IIRC, you can't dry fire those, because without the bolt to dampen/slow the release of energy some of those will self-destruct.

While I admire her intelligence (regarding crossbow safety, not choosing spouses ;) ), I don't understand Mrs. Alex's concern, how could a selfless person get hurt? :? Unless of course you consider her selfless, but she doesn't consider herself selfless. :shock:

Please tell her I understand, and someday I look forward to someday hearing her say "Hello Simple Minded. My name is _____. I am pleased to meet you!" ;)
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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby Simple Minded » Tue Jan 12, 2016 12:20 am

manolo wrote:These things are blinking dangerous.

http://www.wfaa.com/story/news/local/in ... /19191991/

Alex.


What's the most common phrase a redneck says just before he dies?
"Hey y'all! Watch this!"
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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby Nonc Hilaire » Tue Jan 12, 2016 1:47 am

manolo wrote:
Simple Minded wrote:.45's are designed for very low penetration (war on women?). These two sentences alone would be enough for a few thousand professional crusaders in the US to "take up arms" against crossbows.


SM,

At least 45s are safer.

I had a very scary time today with my big crossbow. I got it strung,using a pulley device which reduces draw weight by 50%. Once cocked I couldn't get it uncocked!! Just not strong enough to hold back the poundage (without the pulley) whilst pulling the trigger with my third hand. :x The wife won't touch it, or even be in the same room.

Anyway, I made up some safety device with parachute cord and kind of 'rapelled' the bastard string gradually down, inch by inch. Phew! These things are blinking dangerous.

http://www.wfaa.com/story/news/local/in ... /19191991/

Alex.

I assume your third hand is on your third arm? http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=third+arm
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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby manolo » Tue Jan 12, 2016 10:52 pm

Nonc Hilaire wrote:I assume your third hand is on your third arm?


Nonc,

Indeed, activation of the third arm does come with such weaponry. I think this is the (not so) hidden secret of gun lovers everywhere.

Alex.
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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby manolo » Wed Mar 09, 2016 9:13 am

Folks,

Update.

The xbow dry fired and fell apart in my hands. :evil: OK, confession time - it was Chinese. Now I've had to order a proper Barnett from the USA and pay decent money.

Alex.
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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby YMix » Wed Mar 09, 2016 9:30 am

I heard Chinese food falls apart in your mouth.
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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby noddy » Wed Mar 09, 2016 9:38 am

i hate it when i dry fire and it falls apart in my hands.
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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby Simple Minded » Wed Mar 09, 2016 1:13 pm

manolo wrote:Folks,

Update.

The xbow dry fired and fell apart in my hands. :evil: OK, confession time - it was Chinese. Now I've had to order a proper Barnett from the USA and pay decent money.

Alex.


Alex,

Pretty sure I warned you about this...... accidental discharge?

Ah.... the power of rationalization! More important than sex!
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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby Simple Minded » Wed Mar 09, 2016 1:17 pm

noddy wrote:i hate it when i dry fire and it falls apart in my hands.


No you don't. If you did, you wouldn't keep doing it!

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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby Nonc Hilaire » Wed Mar 09, 2016 4:49 pm

I'm not a military history guy, but wasn't the English longbow proven to be the superior weapon at Agincourt? I thought the French lost due to limitations of their crossbows.
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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby YMix » Wed Mar 09, 2016 5:22 pm

Nonc Hilaire wrote:I'm not a military history guy, but wasn't the English longbow proven to be the superior weapon at Agincourt? I thought the French lost due to limitations of their crossbows.


The French lost due to a combination of factors. Which factor was the most important is up for debate. You can blame the muddy field, the disastrous lack of leadership on the French side or the crossbows. Frankly, this is the first time I hear about French crossbows being a problem.
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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby Typhoon » Wed Mar 09, 2016 10:13 pm

YMix wrote:
Nonc Hilaire wrote:I'm not a military history guy, but wasn't the English longbow proven to be the superior weapon at Agincourt? I thought the French lost due to limitations of their crossbows.


The French lost due to a combination of factors. Which factor was the most important is up for debate. You can blame the muddy field, the disastrous lack of leadership on the French side or the crossbows. Frankly, this is the first time I hear about French crossbows being a problem.


Well, the French may have lost the battle at Agincourt, but they did win the Hundred Year's War, so-called, culminating in the Battle of Castillon.

The success of the English expedition to and occupation of France is best assessed by consulting a current map of Europe.

After all, according to the Brits, the Wogs begin at Calais, not Strasbourg. :wink:
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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby manolo » Sat Mar 12, 2016 8:30 am

Nonc Hilaire wrote:I'm not a military history guy, but wasn't the English longbow proven to be the superior weapon at Agincourt? I thought the French lost due to limitations of their crossbows.


Nonc,

Yes, the longbow was regarded as the superior weapon. One big advantage is the speed with which arrows can be loaded and loosed. The crossbow is more cumbersome to cock, and takes much longer. Against this, the longbow requires much training and skill. I believe that the French would cut the fingers from captured longbowmen to prevent them returning to action in later wars.

Alex.
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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby manolo » Sat Mar 12, 2016 8:41 am

Simple Minded wrote:
Pretty sure I warned you about this...... accidental discharge?



SM,

In this case, not user error. There was a partial dry fire, despite the arrow being placed correctly and the nock aligned. For some reason the string went over the arrow, stripped a fletching and that was it. I'm moving to Barnett as we have them as club bows at the range and I've had no problems with them. Also the strings are more substantial than the Chinese ones with much neater servings.

As it happens, there is similar with my slingshots, The Barnett's are nicely made, with good alignment of the forks etc, whereas the Taiwanese singshots, whilst cheap, are visibly poorer in construction.

Alex.
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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby Simple Minded » Sat Mar 12, 2016 1:30 pm

manolo wrote:
Simple Minded wrote:
Pretty sure I warned you about this...... accidental discharge?



SM,

In this case, not user error. There was a partial dry fire, despite the arrow being placed correctly and the nock aligned. For some reason the string went over the arrow, stripped a fletching and that was it. I'm moving to Barnett as we have them as club bows at the range and I've had no problems with them. Also the strings are more substantial than the Chinese ones with much neater servings.

As it happens, there is similar with my slingshots, The Barnett's are nicely made, with good alignment of the forks etc, whereas the Taiwanese singshots, whilst cheap, are visibly poorer in construction.

Alex.


Glad to hear you are safe. Hopefully Mrs. Alex witnessed the event, so she will have some good stories to tell.

It would suck to have to give our resident redneck philosopher a Darwin award post humorously.... ;)
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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby manolo » Wed Mar 23, 2016 10:46 am

Simple Minded wrote: ..redneck philosopher..)


SM,

I have heard europhiles call it 'autodictat' but I prefer your term. Never made any hooch though; home brewed scrumpy is what gets my grey cells working on matters existential.

Alex.
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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby Simple Minded » Wed Mar 23, 2016 11:44 am

manolo wrote:
Simple Minded wrote: ..redneck philosopher..)


SM,

I have heard europhiles call it 'autodictat' but I prefer your term. Never made any hooch though; home brewed scrumpy is what gets my grey cells working on matters existential.

Alex.


Alex,

"autodictat" What meaneth this strange word thou speaketh?

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/autodidact

OTOH, autodidact and redneck do seem to by synonyms..... or maybe cinnamons.....

Kinda like Renaissance men!
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Re: Becoming an arbalist

Postby manolo » Sat Apr 02, 2016 9:33 pm

Simple Minded wrote:
Kinda like Renaissance men!


SM,

You've touched a nerve. I used to think of myself as 'renaissance man' until a bitchy aunt called me 'jack of all trades'. That was a come down. :( She's dead now.

Alex.

PS - That sad smiley was about the come down, not about her being dead.

PPS - Still waiting for the Barnett.
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